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Posts Tagged ‘FBI’

On MLK Day 2020: The Mythmaking Continued…on Steroids – LewRockwell

Posted by M. C. on January 24, 2020

Of all the men in America, Hoover was the one least likely to be tolerant of Reverend King’s sexual content. In addition to being anti-Negro, Hoover considered himself to be a devout Christian. Apparently he was a celibate and he may have been a latent homosexual. So a black reverend troublemaker receiving the Nobel Peace Prize while practicing adultry . . . this was enough to drive Hoover up the wall!

https://www.lewrockwell.com/2020/01/phillip-f-nelson/mlk-day-2020-the-mythmaking-continues-on-steroids-2/

By

LBJ: Master of Deceit

Civil Rights Leaders Memorialize Martin Luther King’s Birthday Last Year

Given the known fact that many current-day leaders of the civil rights campaign harbor doubts (while some have no doubts as to the proven fallacies) about the “official” story, they must have conflicted thoughts as to their participation in the twice-annual memorials to his life and legendary accomplishments. Does the desire to honor his legacy at the site where he was killed connote an implicit acceptance of the mythology about how he became a martyr? Other newspapers from across the country and around the world will also deal with this “disconnect” one way or another.

Deconstructing the Official Mythology: Starting With the Original Sources

It is safe to say that the vast majority will choose the easy course: to repeat the “same old” story originally concocted by the novelist William Bradford Huie in his three articles published in Look magazine in 1968-69 and his 1970 book He Slew the Dreamer (though originally “He” was supposed to be “They”, a canard he used to solicit the cooperation of the subject of his book: the accused assassin James Earl Ray).

But Huie’s story was clearly commissioned by the FBI, in advance, as a means to convince an entire nation that Ray was the assassin, in the process casting him just as the assassin’s profile described him: “An uneducated, poor, southern White man, who hated Blacks and Martin Luther King especially; who stalked Dr. King for weeks before murdering him in Memphis.” Huie, following Hoover’s directive, succeeded in creating this meme despite the fact that, according to many credible people including Dr. King’s own family and several associates, Ray was not a racist, nor did he hate or stalk King. Even the HSCA found that Ray was not a racist, one of the only accomplishments of that corrupted “investigation.”

In my book Who Really Killed Martin Luther King Jr. — The Case Against Lyndon B. Johnson and J. Edgar Hoover, I have proven that Huie’s book (used by the FBI, DOJ and the HSCA to support their faux “investigations”) is filled with brazen lies, half-truths and concocted “events” that never happened. It is the sum total of this irrefutable evidence that proves Huie’s mission was defined for him by the men (Hoover, Tolson, DeLoach and Sullivan) and entity (FBI) from whom he obviously got his orders.

There is no other realistic and plausible explanation for why Huie did what he did: What else could possibly explain why he went out of his way to concoct a story that was built on a foundation of now-provable lies? (thanks to the internet, which makes once extremely difficult access to old newspapers and previously-classified FBI and HSCA documents now readily accessible).

And after Huie’s story was published in book form in 1970, he still wasn’t done. In 1977, after the Church Committee’s report came out in 1975-76 chronicling the FBI’s outrageous harassment of Dr. King for decades before his assassination — when many people, especially Blacks, began suspecting a continuing FBI role in his final “neutralization” — Huie republished the book under a new title: Did the FBI Kill Martin Luther King? The chapters were not changed, but he added a new introduction and epilogue.

Between the original and later editions of Huie’s book, two other FBI-commissioned books, recycling and adding to his lies, were published (Gerold Frank’s An American Death . . ., and George McMillan’s The Making of an Assassin . . . ), all of which became the foundation for — and the “bibles” quoted by the HSCA and the national media — the official version of what has been exposed as another “great” American Myth.

Since then, in practically every decade, new offerings have joined those fictional accounts, including those by Gerald Posner, Hamilton Sides, Pate McMichael, Larry Hancock and Stuart Wexler, (and numerous others of lesser note). Each of them add more fodder to the now-severely addled official story that almost no one believes, but many accept merely because it is so often repeated — and relentlessly pushed by the MSM — as per the aphorism by Joseph Goebbels about lies eventually becoming “truths.”


MLK to his “Friend” (From the Grave): Et tu, Bradford? Read the rest of this entry »

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Shame: We Stood By While Saudis Helped Criminals Flee U.S. | The American Conservative

Posted by M. C. on January 21, 2020

https://www.theamericanconservative.com/state-of-the-union/shame-we-stood-by-while-saudis-helped-criminals-flee-u-s/

Thanks to a law quietly passed by Sen. Ron Wyden (D-Ore.) and signed by President Trump in December, we now know that the Saudi government has helped an untold number of its citizens committing crimes here in the U.S. flee back to the Kingdom before facing justice.

This includes Saudis accused of assault, rape and manslaughter, including the 2013 hit-and-run of a 15-year-old girl. It is done, press reports indicate, right under the noses of the FBI, Homeland Security, and “other agencies,” who have not intervened, ostensively because of the special security relationship between the two countries.

In a stunning report yesterday, Shane Dixon Kavanaugh of the Oregonian/OregonLive said his paper obtained a declassified memo under the new directive. In it, the FBI reveals what it knows about Saudi criminals fleeing ahead of court dates, often in the middle of the night, and even after their passports were surrendered to judges. According to Dixon Kavanaugh:

The surreptitious action is done, in part, to spare the wealthy Persian Gulf kingdom embarrassment, the FBI said. Intelligence officials believe the flights from justice will continue without intervention by the American authorities.

Saudi officials “are unlikely to alter this practice in the near term unless the US Government directly addresses this issue with (Saudi Arabia) and ties US cooperation on (Saudi) priorities to ceasing this activity,” according to the FBI.

Wyden, who initiated the bill that would declassify FBI records about these myriad questions, was stunned when the paper first reported the news on Friday.

“I am shocked and appalled at what this memo describes,” he tweeted. “The Trump administration is out of excuses for sitting on its hands while the Saudi government helps these fugitives evade justice.”

But as the report relates, these cases go back some 30 years and several presidential administrations. The newspaper has been working on this story since April when it reported several recent cases in Oregon alone:

They include two accused rapists, a pair of suspected hit-and-run drivers and one man with child porn on his computer.

The five cases share many similarities:

– All were young men studying at a public college or university in Oregon with assistance from the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia at the time of their arrest.

– In four of the cases, the Saudi government stepped in to help, posting large sums of money for bail and possibly underwriting legal fees.

– Three surrendered their passports.

– All disappeared while facing charges or jail time.

But we know that the problem goes way beyond Oregon and all the way to the top. According to a ProPublica report in April by Dixon Kavanaugh, Sebastian Rotella, and Tim Golden, the U.S. government has long put its security relationship ahead of its human rights and justice concerns.

“It’s not that the issue of Saudi fugitives from the U.S. wasn’t important,” said retired FBI agent Jeffrey Danik, who served as the agency’s assistant legal attache in Riyadh from 2010 to 2012. “It’s that the security relationship was so much more important. On counterterrorism, on protecting the U.S. and its partners, on opposing Iran, the Saudis were invaluable allies.”

While the federal officials interviewed by the reporters seemed to deflect the problem (“it never came to my desk,” “there was little communication from local agencies”) it becomes clear that there was no incentive to make it an issue. And because of the heavy redactions in the memo, and what we are going to assume is scattershot reporting on this across the board, it is difficult to get a handle on how widespread this is.

Within the federal government, information about the Saudi cases has been scattered across several agencies, none of which have had much incentive to address the problem. FBI and CIA officials in Saudi Arabia have concentrated on preserving Saudi cooperation in the fight against Islamist terrorism; matters that might jeopardize that goal have often been avoided, officials said.

Obviously this raises even more questions about our foreign military trainees, 21 of which are being expelled from the U.S. this week because extremist material and child porn were found on their computers and/or personal devices (apparently not enough to prosecute). According to federal officials the men were not tied to the Saudi trainee at the U.S. Naval Air Station in Pensacola who killed three airmen and injured eight others, while his compatriots captured it on video on Dec. 6.

Wyden and U.S. Sen. Jeff Merkley, D-Oregon, have introduced additional legislation that would get to the bottom of how fugitives are allowed to slip through the system. They appear to be the only members of Congress who give a damn.

“The Saudis are supposed to be our allies,” Wyden told The Oregonian. “If these are our friends, who needs enemies?”

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Why in the world would Wyden (and Trump) think the Saudis are our allies? The Wahabists support the worst of the worst Islamic jihadi terrorists, gave us Osama bin Laden and 17 of the 9/11 hijackers, support extremist Islamic madrassas world wide and bomb Yemeni schools and hospitals. And for some reason the US is fixated on Iran? How about the Trump administration turn at least some of their attention to holding the Saudis accountable for all the Wahabist atrocities inflicted on the world.

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Judge slams FBI for improper cellphone search, stingray use | Ars Technica

Posted by M. C. on January 19, 2020

https://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/2018/07/judge-slams-fbi-for-improper-cellphone-search-stingray-use/

 

A federal judge in San Francisco recently excoriated the government over its improper methods in searching one suspect’s cell phone and in the use of a stingray to find an alleged co-conspirator.

Prosecutors say the two men, Donnell Artis and Chanta Hopkins, were engaged in credit card fraud and also illegally possessed firearms, among other pending charges that also involve four other people.

The crux of the issue is that, in April 2016, an FBI agent sought and obtained two warrants from an Alameda County Superior Court judge: one to search Artis’ phone and another to deploy a stingray to locate Hopkins.

As Ars has reported for years, stingrays are in use by both local and federal law enforcement agencies nationwide. The devices determine a target phone’s location by spoofing or simulating a cell tower. Mobile phones in range of the stingray then connect to it and exchange data with the device as they would with a real cell tower.

Once deployed, stingrays intercept data from the target phone along with information from other phones within the vicinity—up to and including full calls and text messages. At times, police have falsely claimed that information gathered from a stingray has instead come from a confidential informant.

Good faith

However, California law does not allow state judges to sign off on warrants for federal agents, something that this particular FBI agent, Stonie Carlson, apparently did not know.

“But the two warrants were plagued by numerous errors, reflecting a pattern of systematic recklessness by law enforcement that militates in favor of suppressing the evidence (and against applying the ‘good-faith exception’ to the exclusionary rule),” US District Judge Vince Chhabria wrote in a July 3 order. “This ruling is published separately to put the relevant actors in the criminal justice system on notice that California law prevents state judges from issuing search warrants to federal law enforcement officers, which means that federal law enforcement officers are not permitted to execute such warrants.”

In a hearing before Judge Chhabria on Tuesday, July 17, prosecutors reiterated that they would seek to appeal his separate order that suppressed evidence obtained as a result of those illegal searches. This process will take months to be heard before the 9th US Circuit Court of Appeals. If this ruling is upheld, it would throw a major wrench into the prosecutions of Artis and Hopkins.

“The good-faith exception to the exclusionary rule does not apply in this case,” Judge Chhabria wrote in the second July 3 order. “Perhaps any one of the above-referenced errors, viewed in isolation, could be excused under the good-faith exception. But the whole string of errors embodied in these warrant applications militates against applying the good-faith exception. Indeed, although the above-described errors are the most egregious ones, they are not the only instances of sloppy, inappropriate law enforcement work.”

In his orders, Judge Chhabria referred multiple times to a recent stingray case out of Oakland, United States v. Ellis, in which another federal judge definitively found that using a stingray requires a valid warrant.

During a December 2017 hearing, Judge Chhabria also had this incredible exchange with Randall Leonard, an Assistant United States Attorney who argued that because Agent Carlson was part of a sheriff-federal task force, he should be considered a sheriff, with all the rights of a state “peace officer.”

Judge Chhabria didn’t buy it.

THE COURT: Federal law makes him a sheriff under California law?

MR. LEONARD: Well, I mean—

THE COURT: So if federal law said that all French poodles are sheriffs under California law, would that be OK?

MR. LEONARD: Of course not, Your Honor.

THE COURT: There would have to be California law saying, “Yes, we agree that French poodles are sheriffs;” right?

MR. LEONARD: Certainly.

THE COURT: Otherwise French poodles would not be a sheriff under California law, right?

MR. LEONARD: That’s right.

In short, because Carlson had the wrong type of warrant, that was effectively the same as having no warrant at all—therefore, it was an unconstitutional search. Ultimately, Judge Chhabria found this argument convincing.

“The judge’s order suppressing the FBI agent’s illegal use of the cell-site simulator to locate Mr. Hopkins is in line with the understanding that we all have a legally recognized privacy expectation in our location,” Gruel emailed Ars.

“Whether the FBI uses a GPS or a stingray device to locate someone, the courts are clear that there must be a search warrant supported by probable cause.”

Plus, he added: “We had to dig up what the FBI agent hid. There was an obvious effort to hide the truth about using the stingray device to locate and arrest my client.”

The United States Attorney’s Office in San Francisco did not respond to Ars’ request for comment.

Both sides are due back in court on September 4.

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Stingray | Gerry Anderson Encyclopedia | Fandom powered by ...

 

 

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RCFP analysis: Court orders FBI to expunge Antiwar.com records

Posted by M. C. on January 18, 2020

The FIB started on Antiwar.com’s case when Antiwar.com reprinted documents available on the ‘net. The FIB didn’t like those particular docs.

Since when has the FIB been concerned about obeying the law? What about the copies the FIB doesn’t tell US about?

A good call by the court but useless in reality. We are dealing with scum.

https://www.rcfp.org/fbi-antiwar-privacy-act/

In late November, a judge for the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of California directed the Federal Bureau of Investigation to expunge certain records relating to Eric Garris, an editor of the website Antiwar.com, which describes itself as promoting “non-interventionism” and posts related news and opinions.

The move comes after the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit held in September that federal law prohibits law enforcement agencies from maintaining records describing First Amendment activity, unless the record “is pertinent to and within the scope of an ongoing law enforcement activity.” The case marked the first time the Ninth Circuit has considered that question.

Garris v. FBI involved the FBI’s collection and maintenance of records on the editors of Antiwar.com. The site’s editors and co-founders, Garris and Justin Raimondo, challenged the bureau’s preservation of records describing their work and sought to have the records expunged under the Privacy Act of 1974. The court of appeals agreed with their arguments related to a detailed post-9/11 “threat assessment” memorandum, noting that the FBI did not demonstrate that the memo at issue was “pertinent” to ongoing law enforcement activity.

Regarding the 2004 FBI memo, the court stated: “It cannot be that maintaining a record of purely protected First Amendment activity is relevant to an authorized law enforcement activity simply on the representation that maintaining the record would ‘serve to inform ongoing and future investigative activity.’”

This decision may be significant in light of recent high-profile examples of government efforts to monitor journalists based on newsgathering activity. In May, for instance, the Reporters Committee joined a group of 103 organizations that signed a letter to the then-acting secretary of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security raising concerns over reports of surveillance activities by U.S. Customs and Border Protection and Immigration and Customs Enforcement. The letter called for an end to the practice, warning that surveillance of journalists may violate the Privacy Act and infringe on the rights of the press.

The court’s decision to clarify what is permissible under the Privacy Act is also notable given the history of the law.

History of the Privacy Act

Congress passed the Privacy Act of 1974 largely to address instances of illegal government surveillance of individuals based on what many considered to be protected First Amendment activity. As our Reporters Committee colleague Linda Moon noted in June, “Revelations of domestic surveillance of journalists and others exercising First Amendment rights were in the minds of lawmakers considering the Privacy Act prior to its passage.”

Indeed, from about 1956 to 1971, the FBI targeted political organizations it deemed “subversive” through an operation called “COINTELPRO.” The bureau gathered intelligence through illegal surveillance methods, and agents were instructed to discredit the leaders of the groups. Both the CIA and NSA also had programs monitoring, among others, journalists.

In 1974, Congress responded to these programs by passing the Privacy Act, along with amendments to the Freedom of Information Act. The Reporters Committee observed in 2009 that, “Together, the laws were meant to keep the public aware of government’s machinations, while giving meaning to a person’s right to be free from government intrusion.” The Privacy Act permits individuals to access and correct records on them held by the government. Crucially, it mandates that the government “maintain no record describing how any individual exercises rights guaranteed by the First Amendment unless … pertinent to and within the scope of an authorized law enforcement activity.”

The question in Garris was whether the FBI could legally hold on to memos on First Amendment activities that were no longer pertinent to an ongoing case.

The Ninth Circuit’s decision

While the website Antiwar.com self-describes as advocating for “non-interventionism” — effectively opposition to interference in other nations’ affairs and war except in self-defense — the content on the site includes both original and aggregated news and analysis on war, foreign policy, civil liberties, and other related issues. After learning through documents released pursuant to Freedom of Information Act requests that the FBI had created records focusing on their website, Garris and Raimondo filed the action in 2013. Raimondo passed away last year, but Garris’ appeal remained.

The issues for Antiwar originated almost two decades ago. According to Brennan Center for Justice fellow Mike German’s book “Disrupt, Discredit, and Divide,” on Sept. 12, 2001, Garris received an email threatening to hack the website. He forwarded it the FBI, but did not receive a response.

In March 2004, the FBI informed all field offices that an unclassified post-9/11 suspect list had been posted on the internet. “An FBI agent subsequently discovered a twenty-two-page untitled Excel spreadsheet, dated 10/03/2001” — likely an FBI watchlist — published on Antiwar.com. The Newark, New Jersey, office of the FBI prepared a 10-page “threat assessment” on Antiwar. The memo described the site’s mission and included a description of six articles found through a Lexis Nexis search for Garris and Antiwar.com. Further, the memo noted that “persons of interest” to the FBI had accessed or discussed the website.

The memo ultimately indicated that the Newark office recommended that the FBI’s field office in San Francisco monitor Garris and Antiwar’s postings. Yet the San Francisco office declined to do so, explaining that the website was “not a clear threat to National Security.” It categorized the site as a source of public information and said Garris “[was] exercising [his] constitutional right to free speech.”

Garris learned of the 2004 memo after it was released as part of an unrelated FOIA request. Garris then filed his own FOIA request, and the subsequent response was not as heavily redacted as the version that was posted online. The document stated that Garris had threatened to “disrupt FBI operations by hacking the FBI website.” As German points out, however, this was clearly a mistake. The analyst who received the email from Garris believed the message was a threat against the FBI, and did not realize that Garris was actually forwarding the email that contained the threat against Antiwar’s own website. Still, according to the memo, the FBI continued to monitor Garris and Antiwar.

Garris filed FOIA and Privacy Act requests seeking all FBI records about him, and when he exhausted the administrative remedies, he filed a lawsuit. He also separately filed requests seeking expungement of all records maintained by the FBI that described his exercise of First Amendment rights.

During the litigation, Garris also learned of the existence of another memo, called the “Halliburton Memo.” In 2006, the FBI’s Oklahoma City field office created the memo, which detailed plans by groups to protest Halliburton, the oil field services company once run by former Vice President Dick Cheney. Antiwar.com had posted information about a Halliburton shareholders’ meeting, and so the website was listed in the memo as one of the sources of publicly shared information about the meeting.

Garris sought expungement of these records, arguing that the law enforcement activity exception did not apply to them because the investigations in both memos had ended and the records were not pertinent to an ongoing authorized law enforcement activity. The U.S. District Court for the Northern District of California ultimately granted summary judgment to the FBI. The parties settled the remaining disclosure issues, but Garris appealed the Privacy Act claims.

Though there were many issues for the court to consider, the most pertinent for press freedom purposes was whether maintaining the 2004 memo and the Halliburton memo violated the Privacy Act, or whether they fell within the “law enforcement activity” exception (i.e., the government can maintain records if “pertinent” to an authorized law enforcement activity).

The question largely turned on statutory interpretation. The FBI argued that the “law enforcement activity” exception allows agencies to both collect and maintain records so long as they were pertinent to an authorized law enforcement activity at the time of collection. But the appeals court rejected that interpretation, stating, “to accept the FBI’s preferred reading would be to read the word ‘maintain’ out of the statute.” The court suggested that if that had been the intent, Congress could have specifically stated that it was enough to fall under the exception for a record to be “compiled for” an authorized law enforcement activity. Instead, the court reasoned that, according to the language, each act of an agency must individually be justified to fall under the exception.

The decision also highlighted the legislative history of the Privacy Act. Quoting MacPherson v. Internal Revenue Service, the appeals court ruling stated that “Congress was clearly interested in preventing both collection and retention of records, with a strong eye to preventing the government from maintaining ‘information not immediately needed, about law-abiding Americans, on the off-chance that Government or the particular agency might possibly have to deal with them in the future.’” Yet the government had contended just that, saying the maintenance of the 2004 memo would “serve to inform ongoing and future investigative activity.”

The court ultimately held that this was not enough, and the FBI had not met the burden under the interpretation of the Privacy Act. Instead, “The 2004 Memo specifically details Garris’ protected First Amendment activities, including his political views and articles he wrote, allegedly to conduct a threat assessment prompted by the posting of the FBI watch list.” The court even noted that the FBI conceded that the posting of the list was protected First Amendment activity. The FBI failed to offer a connection between the memo and a specific investigation, and so the “law enforcement activity” exception did not apply.

This acknowledgement — by both the FBI and the court — is important. Indeed, as the Reporters Committee has previously noted, news outlets are often the recipients of leaked or classified information. It is common for many news outlets to post full or edited versions of documents. Yet posting information that has been obtained legally is not illegal. Indeed, the act of posting government information should not in itself warrant opening an investigation into the outlet or its reporters.

While the court did note that the Halliburton memo was of “ongoing relevance” to law enforcement’s preparation for “an oft-protested meeting,” the court also stated the Halliburton memo was not specifically filed under Garris’ name or that of Antiwar.com. Instead, the website was listed merely to provide context as to where coverage of the shareholders’ meeting can be found.” Thus, the court stated that the memo did not have to be expunged.

Ultimately, given the court’s holding on the 2004 memo, this decision sheds light on an important but rarely considered provision of the Privacy Act, and clarifies in the Ninth Circuit that government agencies have an obligation to expunge records that lack a direct connection to an ongoing criminal investigation.

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Yes son, you too can grow up to be lying scum and hate black people.

 

 

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Ukrainian 752 Shoot-Down Mirrors Fate of TWA 800 – American Thinker

Posted by M. C. on January 11, 2020

Accidents had happened before in such an environment.  On July 3, 1988, at the tail end of the Iran-Iraq War, an Aegis cruiser in the Persian Gulf, the USS Vincennes, fired two Standard Missiles at a commercial Iranian Airbus, IR 655.

With the media’s help, the truth about the Vincennes ultimately surfaced.  With the media’s help, the truth about TWA 800 was successfully buried, but here is what we have been able to dig up…

https://www.americanthinker.com/articles/2020/01/ukrainian_752_shootdown_mirrors_fate_of_twa_800.html

By Jack Cashill

Canadian prime minister Justin Trudeau is saying out loud what others have been thinking since the news broke that Ukraine International Airlines Flight 752 crashed soon after taking off from the airport in Tehran — namely, that “the plane was shot down by an Iranian surface-to-air missile,” likely unintentionally.

According to the New York Times, American officials also had a “high level of confidence” that the Iranians destroyed the airliner by mistake.  One official specifically cited two SA-15 missiles fired from an Iranian air defense system.

If Trudeau proves right, this will not be the first time an anxious military accidentally shot down a non-threatening commercial aircraft.  On July 17, 1996, a comparable missile strike destroyed TWA 800 off the coast of Long Island shortly after the Boeing 747 took off from JFK.

We know why the Iranians were antsy earlier this week.  Their military fired off multiple missiles late Tuesday night at American targets and were likely expecting retaliation.  On July 17, 1996, the American military had reason to be on edge as well.

Two days before the start of the Atlanta Olympics, the Clinton administration had the U.S. Navy on the highest state of alert since the Cuban Missile crisis.  In this hair-trigger environment, accidents could happen.

Accidents had happened before in such an environment.  On July 3, 1988, at the tail end of the Iran-Iraq War, an Aegis cruiser in the Persian Gulf, the USS Vincennes, fired two Standard Missiles at a commercial Iranian Airbus, IR 655.

IR 655 had reached 13,500 feet, a final altitude almost identical to TWA 800’s, when Capt. Will Rogers III gave the order to fire.  Rogers and his crew had mistaken the ascending passenger jet with 290 people on board for a descending Iranian F-14, a fighter plane.

With the media’s help, the truth about the Vincennes ultimately surfaced.  With the media’s help, the truth about TWA 800 was successfully buried, but here is what we have been able to dig up.

  • In the last several years, researchers have unearthed an astonishing treasure trove of CIA documents and secured a confirmed video of a Long Island missile launch on July 12, five days before TWA 800’s demise on July 17.  The CIA conceded that at least four witnesses had reported seeing a missile launch on July 7, 1996, as well.  Note the dates.  There is a pattern here.
  • According to an air traffic controller at NY TRACON, “[a] primary radar return (ASR-9) indicated vertical movement intersecting TWA 800,” and then “TWA800” disappeared.
  • As Clinton anti-terror czar Richard Clarke tells it, he immediately called a high-level meeting in the White House situation room after the crash.
  • Illegally, but publicly, the FBI seized control of the investigation from the NTSB within hours of the crash.
  • According to CIA documents, “[t]he DI [Directorate of Intelligence] became involved in the ‘missile theory’ the day after the crash occurred.”
  • According to the CIA, within two weeks of the disaster, FBI agents had interviewed 144 “excellent” eyewitnesses to a likely missile strike and found the evidence for such a strike “overwhelming.”
  • The CIA analyst boasted of discouraging the FBI from releasing its missile report.  He seems to have succeeded.
  • Two weeks later, the FBI permitted the New York Times to interview one and only one eyewitness.  He saw the event out of the corner of his eye and thought it was a bomb.
  • The NTSB eventually identified 258 eyewitnesses who had seen a glowing object streaking towards TWA 800.  At least 56 had followed the object from the horizon.
  • The Times interviewed none of the 258.
  • At the FBI’s direction, the Times ran an above-the-fold, front-page headline on August 23, 1996, “Prime Evidence Found That Device Exploded in Cabin of TWA 800.”
  • On September 19, the Times signaled the government’s switch from a “bomb” to a “mechanical failure alone” explanation.
  • On September 20, to make sense of the switch, the FBI claimed that the TWA 800 aircraft had “previously been used in a law enforcement training exercise for bomb-detection dogs.”
  • As was easily proved, the test in question did not take place on the TWA 800 plane, and the training aids did not match in placement or in composition the explosive residue found.
  • The eyewitnesses were not so easily explained away.  With the NTSB illegally shut out of witness review, the FBI turned the task over to the CIA.
  • Working with just one third of the witness statements, the CIA concluded that the eyewitnesses saw the nose-less aircraft ascend more than 3,000 feet, mimicking the path of a missile.
  • In April 1997, a dissenter on the FBI missile team, Steve Bongardt, demanded to know why the CIA failed to account for the eight witnesses who saw an object “hit the aircraft.”
  • To sell its lie, as the CIA documents prove, the CIA created at least three critical witness statements from whole cloth and flagrantly corrupted more than two hundred others.

Nothing the Iranians say about the cause of the crash can be taken at face value.  At this stage, they are denying responsibility and claiming mechanical failure.  In 1996, we did the same.  As we have seen with the Russia collusion hoax, our intelligence agencies can be subverted when the party in power rewards them for their mischief and the media cover it up.

Let the Iranians worry about Iranian screw-ups.  It is past time we investigate our own.

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What Really Happened To TWA Flight 800? - YouTube

 

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Armies Of Unidentified Drones Are Appearing Over The Western U.S. At Night, And It Is Really Freaking People Out – End Of The American Dream

Posted by M. C. on January 9, 2020

Because if these drones do not have a U.S. origin, then that opens up a completely different can of worms.

This sounds like a good sci-fi movie.

If this is a “true fact” it would take an organization. Civilian maybe, more likely a lying government doing it’s black op thing.

http://endoftheamericandream.com/archives/armies-of-unidentified-drones-are-appearing-over-the-western-u-s-at-night-and-it-is-really-freaking-people-out

Since just before Christmas, armies of unidentified drones have been appearing each night in the skies above Colorado, Nebraska and Kansas.  The drones are approximately 6 feet wide and they have red and white lights, but nobody knows where they are from or who owns them.  This is a story that is now receiving national attention, and the FBI, the FAA and the U.S. Air Force are all investigating this mystery.  According to eyewitnesses, these drones can move “much faster than a regular aircraft”, and that would seem to indicate that they are highly sophisticated.  So far, the U.S. military, every government agency that has been asked, and many of the major companies in the area have all denied operating the drones.  Federal, state and local law enforcement officials have been doing all that they can to solve this mystery, but so far they have come up completely empty.

And even though these drones are now receiving so much attention, they just keep coming back night after night.  According to one northern Colorado resident, when the drones come out it looks like “something from a movie”

For the last week, Michelle Eckert has spotted a high-flying, night-time mystery above her rural northern Colorado home. She has seen drones, sometimes a dozen or more with wingspans 6 feet wide.

“The sky is lit up with Christmas lights basically,” she told CBS News. “There’s lights and things flying all over. It reminded me of something from a movie.”

Sometimes eyewitnesses just see one drone.  In other cases, the drones are working in pairs.  And in other instances, there are large groups of up to 30 drones working in very close coordination.

On Thursday night, a Denver Post reporter went out in search of these drones, and it wasn’t long before some of them were spotted

As light turned to dark Thursday, stars appeared in the night sky. And soon after, so did drones. Around 6:10 p.m., a Denver Post reporter and photographer spotted two unmanned aircraft whizzing west above I-70, 8 miles outside Limon.

More drones could be seen outside Last Chance, a slight whir audible as they passed overhead. The aircraft flashed one red light and one white. Two other yellowish lights remained on throughout the flight. In 20 minutes, a half-dozen flying objects could be seen traversing over the barren wind farms.

The fact that there are so many of them and that they are operating over such a large area would seem to indicate that this is not the work of some rogue individual.

But at this point we don’t have any answers.

Lincoln County Sheriff Tom Nestor has been working on this case for quite a few days, and his county map is now “dotted with blue and yellow thumbtacks” because so many people have been reporting sightings…

Inside the Lincoln County Sheriff’s Office in Hugo on Thursday afternoon, Sheriff Tom Nestor and Capt. Yowell stared at a county map hanging in a narrow hallway.

It’s dotted with blue and yellow thumbtacks, depicting sightings from across the county of just under 5,500 people. There’s a series of tacks clustered around Interstate 70 in Limon, with a few scattered north and south of the interstate. Some people reported the drones flying in packs. Others saw solo flights.

Nestor immediately suspected that a local company may be doing some mapping, but that theory didn’t turn up anything.  And other law enforcement officials in the region have come up empty as well

Nestor said he has spoken to local oil companies and drone experts, learning information but getting no answers. Neighboring sheriffs have spoken to the military, which has denied involvement, he said. The Air Force, the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, the Department of Defense, the Environmental Protection Agency, the North American Aerospace Defense Command and the University of Colorado Boulder have told The Denver Post that they’re not flying the drones.

The FAA has gotten involved, and you would think that they should be able to get to the bottom of this, but they are just as puzzled as everyone else

Already, the FAA has contacted test sites, drone companies and companies that have received authorization to operate drones in the affected areas. But the agency has not been able to determine who is flying the aircraft, spokesman Ian Gregor said in a statement Monday.

The FAA also asked area airports and pilots to report sightings or people they see operating the drones from the ground.

So far there is no evidence that these drones are malicious, but just a few days ago we received a reminder of how deadly they can potentially be.  Iranian military commander Qassem Soleimani was killed by a drone, and he probably never even knew that the attack was coming.

On Monday, dozens of federal, state and local law enforcement officials gathered in the town of Brush to talk about these drones.  At the conclusion of the meeting, reporters were told that there is still “no explanation” for this mystery…

Mysterious drone sightings remains a mystery on Colorado’s Eastern Plains. Monday, more than 70 local, state and federal officials met in Brush to talk about findings and reports from the last couple of weeks.

Multiple law enforcement agencies, the FBI, United States Air Force and the FAA ended the meeting with no explanation of what the objects hovering over vast properties really are.

People living in Colorado, Nebraska and Kansas desperately want some answers, and now a similar sighting has been reported in Minnesota

Drones were reported flying over Juniata and Hastings Sunday night. An operator has not been identified at this time.

Minneapolis Air Traffic Control contacted the Hastings Police Department with a report from an airplane pilot about the drones.

Air traffic control reported the drones were flying in a grid pattern around 9-10 p.m. Sunday, Police Capt. Mike Doremus said.

This sounds very similar to many of the other sightings, but nobody has been able to examine one of these drones up close yet, and so we still don’t know precisely what we are dealing with.

But what we do know is that our world is a very strange place, and it is getting stranger by the day.

Hopefully this is just some relatively harmless top secret U.S. military program that the Pentagon doesn’t want to talk about.

Because if these drones do not have a U.S. origin, then that opens up a completely different can of worms.

About the Author: I am a voice crying out for change in a society that generally seems content to stay asleep. My name is Michael Snyder and I am the publisher of The Economic Collapse Blog, End Of The American Dream and The Most Important News, and the articles that I publish on those sites are republished on dozens of other prominent websites all over the globe. I have written four books that are available on Amazon.com including The Beginning Of The End, Get Prepared Now, and Living A Life That Really Matters. (#CommissionsEarned) By purchasing those books you help to support my work. I always freely and happily allow others to republish my articles on their own websites, but due to government regulations I need those that republish my articles to include this “About the Author” section with each article. In order to comply with those government regulations, I need to tell you that the controversial opinions in this article are mine alone and do not necessarily reflect the views of the websites where my work is republished. This article may contain opinions on political matters, but it is not intended to promote the candidacy of any particular political candidate. The material contained in this article is for general information purposes only, and readers should consult licensed professionals before making any legal, business, financial or health decisions. Those responding to this article by making comments are solely responsible for their viewpoints, and those viewpoints do not necessarily represent the viewpoints of Michael Snyder or the operators of the websites where my work is republished. I encourage you to follow me on social media on Facebook and Twitter, and any way that you can share these articles with others is a great help.

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We Were Warned About the Deep State, but Refused to Listen by Larry C Johnson – Sic Semper Tyrannis

Posted by M. C. on January 2, 2020

What has happened to Donald Trump can happen to any of us. It is time to take this threat seriously and put the intel agencies back into a properly monitored corral. Otherwise, we will lose this Republic.

https://turcopolier.typepad.com/sic_semper_tyrannis/2019/12/we-were-warned-about-the-deep-state-but-refused-to-listen-by-larry-c-johnson.html

by Larry C Johnson

Larry Johnson-5x7

Many of the critical tools employed in the coup to paint Donald Trump as a tool of the Russians and to manufacture a pretext for removing him from office, were created more than twenty years ago. I am talking about the surveillance state that the American electorate has ignorantly accepted as necessary in order to keep us safe from terrorists. Despite previous warning from whistleblowers like Russ Tice, Bill Binney, Ed Loomis and Kird Wiebe, no action to rein in the surveillance monster was taken until Edward Snowden absconded with the documents exposing the vast amount spying that the U.S. Government is doing to its own citizens. But even those weak efforts to supposedly rein in the NSA proved to be nothing more than mere window dressing.

The spying got worse. Just ask Donald Trump and the members of his campaign that were targeted first by the CIA and NSA and then by the FBI. Fundamental civil rights were trampled.

The real irony in all of this is that Barack Obama, as President, took credit for helping revise the laws in order to prevent the spying exposed by Edward Snowden. But under the Obama Administration, spying on political opponents–both real and perceived–escalated. We know for a fact that journalists, such as James Rosen and Sheryl Atkinson, were targets and their communications and computers attacked by the U.S. Government.

We know, thanks to a memo released by Judge Rosemary Collyer, that “FBI consultants” were making illegal searches of NSA material using the names of Donald Trump, his family and members of his campaign staff.

Some of this NSA material came courtesy of the Brits and their collection on U.S. targets. Some of this material came from the NSA’s own collection and storage of all electronic communications and was obtained using a nifty NSA tool called XKEYSCORE. Listen to Ed Snowden’s description. Also, take time to appreciate the irony that CNN and other journalists were actually trying to report real news. Now they are full blown apologists for the abuse of the intelligence collection tools. 

Six years ago, former NSA Technical Director for Military and Geopolitical Issues, Bill Binney, and Russ Tice, a former NSA analyst, appeared on the PBS News Hour. Once again, they make very clear the enormous nature to the threat to our civil liberties.

Too bad Donald Trump did not listen to their warning.

Given the robust, wide ranging ability of the NSA to probe all communications by any person in the United States, it is remarkable that no real dirt on Donald Trump was ever uncovered. Had such information existed, it would be in the NSA’s storage vaults in Utah and crooked CIA analysts under Brennan’s direction would have found it and used it. But that did not happed. The best the intel folks could fabricate were the salacious claims attributed to reports ostensibly created by former British spy, Christopher Steele. Turns out that the titillating account that Trump hired hookers to perform coprophilia (could of been worse, coprophagia) was nothing more than idle bar talk.

What has happened to Donald Trump can happen to any of us. It is time to take this threat seriously and put the intel agencies back into a properly monitored corral. Otherwise, we will lose this Republic.

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FIB

 

 

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Ann Coulter: Happy Kwanzaa! The Holiday Brought to You by the FBI

Posted by M. C. on December 26, 2019

When Karenga was asked to distinguish Kawaida, the philosophy underlying Kwanzaa, from “classical Marxism,” he essentially said that, under Kawaida, we also hate whites.

While taking the “best of early Chinese and Cuban socialism” (is that the mass murder, the imprisonment of homosexuals or the forced labor?), Karenga said Kawaida practitioners believe one’s racial identity “determines life conditions, life chances and self-understanding.”

There’s an inclusive philosophy for you!

https://www.breitbart.com/politics/2019/12/26/ann-coulter-happy-kwanzaa-the-holiday-brought-to-you-by-the-fbi-2/

Kwanzaa, celebrated exclusively by white liberals, is a fake holiday invented in 1966 by black radical/FBI stooge Ron Karenga — aka Dr. Maulana Karenga, founder of United Slaves, the violent nationalist rival to the Black Panthers. Liberals have become so mesmerized by multicultural gibberish that they have forgotten the real history of Kwanzaa and Karenga’s United Slaves.

In what was ultimately a foolish gambit, during the madness of the ’60s, the FBI encouraged the most extreme black nationalist organizations in order to discredit and split the left. The more preposterous the group, the better. (It’s the same function MSNBC serves today.)

By that criterion, Karenga’s United Slaves was perfect.

Despite modern perceptions that blend all the black activists of the ’60s, the Black Panthers did not hate whites. Although some of their most high-profile leaders were drug dealers and murderers, they did not seek armed revolution.

Those were the precepts of Karenga’s United Slaves. The United Slaves were proto-fascists, walking around in dashikis, gunning down Black Panthers and adopting invented “African” names. (I will not be shooting any Black Panthers this week because I am Kwanzaa-reform, and we are not that observant.)

It’s as if David Duke invented a holiday called “Anglika,” which he based on the philosophy of “Mein Kampf” — and clueless public schoolteachers began celebrating the made-up, racist holiday.

In the category of the-gentleman-doth-protest-too-much, back in the ’70s, Karenga was quick to criticize Nigerian newspapers that claimed that certain American black radicals were CIA operatives.

Now we know the truth: The FBI fueled the bloody rivalry between the Panthers and United Slaves. In the annals of the American ’60s, Karenga was the Father Gapon, stooge of the czarist police. Whether Karenga was a willing FBI dupe, or just a dupe, remains unclear.

But the left has forgotten the FBI’s tacit encouragement of this murderous black nationalist cult founded by the father of Kwanzaa.

In one barbarous outburst, Karenga’s United Slaves shot two Black Panthers to death on the UCLA campus: Al “Bunchy” Carter and John Huggins. Karenga himself served time — a useful stepping-stone for his current position as the chair of the Africana Studies Department at California State University at Long Beach.

(Speaking of which, the cheap labor lobby certainly was right about how the GOP could easily win over “socially conservative” minorities. Look at how California has swung decisively to the right since whites became a minority there. Good luck winning California now, Democrats!)

Back to the esteemed Cal State professor: Karenga’s invented holiday is a nutty blend of schmaltzy ’60s rhetoric, black racism and Marxism. The seven principles of Kwanzaa are the very same seven principles of the Symbionese Liberation Army, another invention of The Worst Generation.

In 1974, Patty Hearst, kidnap victim-cum-SLA revolutionary, famously posed next to the banner of her alleged captors, a seven-headed cobra. Each snakehead stood for one of the SLA’s revolutionary principles: Umoja, Kujichagulia, Ujima, Ujamaa, Nia, Kuumba and Imani. These are the exact same seven “principles” of Kwanzaa, or “Kawaida,” as Karenga calls them. (And here’s something interesting: Kawaida, Kwanzaa and Kuumba are also the only three Kardashian sisters not to have their own shows on the E! network.)

Kwanzaa praises collectivism in every possible area of life. It takes a village to raise a police snitch.

When Karenga was asked to distinguish Kawaida, the philosophy underlying Kwanzaa, from “classical Marxism,” he essentially said that, under Kawaida, we also hate whites.

While taking the “best of early Chinese and Cuban socialism” (is that the mass murder, the imprisonment of homosexuals or the forced labor?), Karenga said Kawaida practitioners believe one’s racial identity “determines life conditions, life chances and self-understanding.”

There’s an inclusive philosophy for you!

Sing to “Jingle Bells”:

Kwanzaa bells, dashikis sell
Whitey has to pay;
Burning, shooting, oh what fun
On this made-up holiday!

Kwanzaa emerged not from Africa, but from the FBI’s COINTELPRO. It is a holiday celebrated exclusively by idiot white liberals. Black people celebrate Christmas.

Merry Christmas, fellow Christians!

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Report: FISA Court Has Not Ordered FBI to Check FISA Applications Beyond One Lawyer

Posted by M. C. on December 26, 2019

Just in case you had a senior moment and thought the FISA court was a victim.

https://www.breitbart.com/politics/2019/12/25/report-fisa-court-has-not-ordered-fbi-to-check-fisa-applications-beyond-one-lawyer/

by Kristina Wong

The court that granted the FBI surveillance warrants on former Trump campaign adviser Carter Page has only ordered that the FBI review all warrant applications related to one FBI attorney and not all FBI agents involved in misconduct, according to a report.

The Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court (FISC) earlier this month ordered the FBI to re-verify all previous Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act (FISA) warrant applications involving Kevin Clinesmith, the FBI attorney who falsified evidence in the FBI’s efforts to seek a renewed surveillance warrant against Page.

But according to a report by Fox News’s Gregg Re, the FISC did not order the FBI to recheck warrant applications involving other officials who made significant omissions and errors in warrant applications to surveil Page.

Fox News reports:

The FISC’s failure to request a comprehensive evaluation of previous submissions has stunned court-watchers who have questioned whether enough is being done to deter future misconduct by the FBI. In the past, the FISC has gone so far as to prohibit some FBI agents from appearing before the court after finding impropriety.

Justice Department Inspector General Michael Horowitz found that Clinesmith had doctored an email that said Page was a source for the CIA to say that Page was “not” a source for the CIA.

However, Horowitz found many more examples of what the FISC itself has called “misconduct.”

In one example cited by Fox News, Horowitz found that an FBI supervisory special agent (SSA) responsible for ensuring that the bureau’s “Woods Procedures” were followed in this case — in that all factual assertions be independently verified and information contradicting those assertions be presented to the court — did not follow those procedures.

The SSA created a digital sub-file where reports by Christopher Steele, ex-British spy working for Fusion GPS, would be uploaded. Those reports were uncorroborated yet used to support the argument that Page was a foreign agent.

The SSA also suspected that Steele was a source for a news report that was included in warrant applications on Page, but he downplayed it in FISA applications. The SSA was also told by a State Department official that Steele was wrong about a claim but that information was not put in any FISA applications.

The SSA also failed to put in other information that was exculpatory for Page, such as Page denying to an FBI confidential human source (CHS) that he knew Russian officials Igor Sechin and Igor Divyekin, which Steele had alleged.

The SSA was also aware that Steele had provided his reports to the State Department, but the FISC was told that Steele “only provided this information to the business associate and the FBI.”

Despite this, the FISC’s Presiding Judge Rosemary Collyer only ordered the FBI to identify and review all matters that involved the participation of Clinesmith, and advise whether his conduct has been “referred to the appropriate bar association(s) for investigation or possible disciplinary action,” according to Fox News…

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Collyer - Barr speak out about Comey, Clapper, Brennan ...

 

 

 

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JOHN KIRIAKOU: James Comey’s Interview on Fox News Screams Out for Correction – Consortiumnews

Posted by M. C. on December 21, 2019

And the truth of the matter is that the FISA court isn’t really a court at all.  It meets in secret.  A “defendant” has no idea that the government is asking for a warrant against him.  The defendant has no attorney to represent his interests before the court. 

The FISA judges have to know they are being played. The truth is that if they make waves they loose their jobs.

The FISA court has become such an embarrassment to those who pay attention that it has to pretend they care.

https://consortiumnews.com/2019/12/19/john-kiriakou-james-comeys-interview-on-fox-news-screams-out-for-correction/

By John Kiriakou

Former FBI Director James Comey gave an interview this week to journalist Chris Wallace on Fox News in which he made one of the most disingenuous and dissembling statements I’ve heard in years, one that screams out for correction and real Congressional oversight.

When asked about Justice Department Inspector General (IG) Michael Horowitz’s report, which found “17 significant errors and omissions” by the FBI when it began investigating alleged Russian involvement with the 2016 Trump campaign and it applied for a Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act (FISA) warrant against former Trump campaign aide Carter Page, Comey said that he had been “overconfident” when he defended the FBI’s use of FISA.

Overconfident! Comey ignored the fact that the FBI repeatedly renewed the warrant against Page, whom the FBI suspected was working for Russian intelligence, even if it had no evidence to indicate that was the case.  He downplayed the fact that an FBI attorney illegally changed an FBI report to indicate that Page was not working for the CIA, when the FBI knew for a fact that he was.

Perhaps most disingenuously, Comey told Wallace that, “I thought the FBI had gone about this in a thoughtful and appropriate way.  He’s (Horowitz) right.  I was wrong.  I was overconfident as director in our procedures…It’s incredibly hard to get a FISA.”

Comey’s Lie About a FISA Warrant 

Even more importantly, at least for the American people as a whole, is Comey’s lie that “it’s incredibly hard to get a FISA.”  It’s actually incredibly easy to get a FISA.  Over its 33-year lifespan, the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court has issued 33,942 warrants.  It has denied 12.  In fact, between the court’s creation in 1986 and 2003, it didn’t deny a single request for a warrant.  Those numbers simply don’t support Comey’s odd contention that it’s “incredibly hard” to get a FISA.  He’s lying to us… Read the rest of this entry »

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