MCViewPoint

Opinion from a Libertarian ViewPoint

Posts Tagged ‘Public school’

A Homeschooling Guide for Public Schoolers – The Organic Prepper

Posted by M. C. on March 27, 2020

https://www.theorganicprepper.com/a-homeschooling-guide-for-public-schoolers/

by Kara Stiff

My heart goes out to all the parents who were never planning to homeschool, but nevertheless find themselves teaching their children at home today. I chose this beautiful, crazy life, and I completely understand why some people wouldn’t choose it. But here we are. We have to do what we have to do. You don’t want them to fall behind. You don’t want to lose your mind.

Believe it or not, it’s a golden opportunity.

Caveat: these are only my personal thoughts. I’m not a professional educator, just a parent successfully homeschooling.

This advice is only for people whose greatest hurdle right now is remaining sane with the little ones. This is a high bar to clear, to be sure, but some people are facing the little people plus big financial problems, they’re sick or working through mental health issues, or they’re managing other emergencies. In those cases, if you’re keeping everyone more or less fed and warm then you’re succeeding, and you don’t need me to tell you to forget the rest for as long as necessary.

For everyone else, I do have a little advice. I’m sure you’re getting support from your school district, which is excellent. Worrying about what to teach is often a new homeschooler’s first and biggest concern. But deciding what to teach is actually the easy part, and now it’s mom, dad, uncle or grandma doing the really hard part: actually sitting with the kid, helping/making him or her do the work.

First, I think you can safely let go of the worry that you may not be a good enough teacher because you’re a terrible speller, or you think you’re bad at math. It’s good to know these things about yourself so they can be addressed, but the truth is that how great you personally are at division isn’t necessarily a predictor of success. Neither is how well you explain things, or even how well you demonstrate looking things up, although that is a priceless skill to impart to inquiring minds. To my mind, the most important skill for successful homeschooling is:

Controlling your own frustration

We adults are fantastically knowledgeable and amazingly skilled. No, really, we are! So we forget how hard it is to do seemingly simple things for the first time. I remember sitting in my college biochemistry class, listening to the professor say:

“Come on you guys, this is easy!”

Folks, I’m here to tell you that biochemistry isn’t easy for most people who are new to it, especially people who just drug themselves out of bed five minutes ago, possibly with a touch of a hangover. And reading isn’t easy for a five-year-old, and multiplication isn’t easy for an eight-year-old.

The parent has to slow down, go through it again, redirect the child’s attention for the hundredth time and explain the material in a different way, preferably without pulling out their own hair. You can develop these skills. Even if you’re new to it, and you don’t find it easy.

When it just isn’t working, the parent has to know when to shift gears and let it rest. Preserving your relationship with the child is always very important, but it’s doubly so when you’re home with them all day every day.

I think I can safely say that all homeschool parents want to scream sometimes. Many of us have threatened to send our kids to public school at one point or another (or maybe once a week). It doesn’t make you a bad parent or even a bad teacher, it just makes you human. In the last week, I have seen a bunch of public school parents join my online homeschool groups, and the outpouring of sympathy, support and good ideas from homeschool parents makes me tear up. We’re here for you. Get in touch.

Run your day in a way that works for YOU

Just because they’re usually in school for six or eight hours a day doesn’t mean you have to school them for six or eight hours a day. That schedule is a crowd control measure instituted for the good of society, not for the good of children.

My children are homeschooled primarily because I think a kid should spend a lot of time outside moving around, and there just aren’t enough hours in the day to do that and public school. My own public school experience was pretty different from the norm today, with much less homework and much more self-direction, but still, I feel that I didn’t get enough practice directing my own attention. Research backs me up on this: kids who get many hours of freedom develop excellent executive function, which not only makes them a valuable employee but also helps them run their own life someday.

At my house, we do about an hour of formal school work per day, six or seven days a week. The rest of the time the kids help me with gardening and animal care, climb trees and play in the creek, draw and write and read things on their own or together, and make stuff out of Legos. They have an hour of screen time each afternoon just so they will sit down and be quiet, usually a documentary. David Attenborough is definitely this house’s biggest celebrity. We’re also accustomed to spending several days of the week with other homeschool families, although obviously that is curtailed now due to social distancing.

Learning doesn’t stop when we leave the table, because kids are unstoppable learning machines when they’re not too tired or stressed out. I’m always available to answer questions and help look stuff up, and the questions are pretty frequent. An adult reads to them (or they read to us) books of their choosing at bedtime, and sometimes just after dinner, too. It’s also a pretty common occurrence in my house for a child to see an adult reading a novel, a piece of nonfiction, or The Economist, and request to have it read aloud to them, which we do. They also sometimes watch me balance the household budget.

The schedule that works best for your family might look very different from ours, and that is good. Children are people. People have very different needs, and one of the charms of schooling at home is that you can arrange things in a pretty good compromise to meet everyone’s needs. An hour or two of focused one-on-two attention per day is plenty of time for my four- and seven-year-olds to get well ahead of grade level on reading, writing, and math.

Older kids obviously need more time to get through the volume of work they’re expected to do. They can also be more equal partners in directing the learning process, though. My high school placed great emphasis on self-directed learning, and some of the classes I got the most out of were the ones I designed for myself.

This might be a great opportunity for your older kid or teenager to quickly finish their spelling so they can finally study volcanoes in-depth like they’ve always wanted to do. Or maybe they want to rush through the math, so they can work on their comic book. If they have a passion for it I guarantee they’ll be learning something important, and now you have the freedom to let them explore it.

Can we just not?

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NYC says 1.1M students can skip school for climate strike protest

Posted by M. C. on September 17, 2019

I would rather they stay in school and figure out how to power a total electric car culture with solar panels, windmills and no conventional nor nuclear energy.

Independent thought…not a thing government encourages.

https://www.axios.com/climate-strikes-nyc-1m-students-can-skip-school-fdc414c6-1496-4107-85cb-ef6522e4d512.html

School districts are debating what position to take after New York City announced that 1.1 million public school students could skip classes without penalties to join the global youth climate strikes Friday, the New York Times reports.

Why it matters: Per the Times, this a test of the movement’s impact — by causing disruptions and getting noticed by political leaders who are in NYC for the United Nations Climate Action Summit 3 days later and the General Assembly meeting that follows it.

  • Organizers expect millions of people to leave work, home and school to take part in massive climate strike protests around the world.

The big picture: Youth strike advocates Fridays for Future said more than 2400 events were taking place from Sept. 20 through Sept. 27 to coincide with the UN climate summit on Sept. 23, where Swedish climate activist Greta Thunberg is due to make an address.

  • More than 115 countries and 1,000 cities have registered so far, the group said.

“All eyes are on the United States which already has 145 cities signed up, with participation that is expected to be tenfold when compared with  the first two global strikes in March and May of this year.”

What’s happening in the U.S.: The Times reports that large districts around the U.S. were discussing on Monday afternoon the issue of whether to allow students to miss school for the strikes…

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Democratic Presidential Candidate Marianne Williamson Has Whites in Audience Apologize to the Nearest Black

Posted by M. C. on July 28, 2019

https://www.targetliberty.com/2019/07/democratic-presidential-candidate.html?m=1

Starts at 11:10 mark.

Why would every white person in a room have to apologize to blacks if they had nothing to do with slavery, etc.?

In my case, they should be thanking me, since I am in support of freeing anyone in prison on drug charges. I want to stop horrific forced public school education and I want to eliminate the anti-black minimum wage. And I write about this actively.

RW

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Reparations for Slavery – LewRockwell

Posted by M. C. on June 26, 2019

I’d like to see lawyers bring class-action suits against public school systems in cities like Philadelphia, Baltimore, Washington, Detroit and Los Angeles for conferring fraudulent high school diplomas.

https://www.lewrockwell.com/2019/06/walter-e-williams/reparations-for-slavery/

By

…Let’s pretend for a moment that the reparations issue makes a modicum of sense. There’s the question of responsibility. More explicitly, should we compensate a black person of today by punishing a white person of today, by taking his money, for what a white person of yesteryear did to a black person of yesteryear? If we believe in individual accountability, we should find that doing so is unjust. In other words, are the tens millions of Europeans, Asian and Latin Americans who immigrated to the U.S. in the late 19th and 20th centuries responsible for slavery, and should they be forced to cough up reparations? What about descendants of Northern whites who fought and died in the name of freeing slaves? Should they pay reparations to black Americans? What about non-slave-owning Southern whites — who were a majority of Southern whites — should their descendants be made to pay reparations?

Reparations advocates make the unchallenged pronouncement that United States became rich on the backs of free black labor. That’s utter nonsense. While some slave owners became rich, slavery doesn’t have a good record of producing wealth. Slavery existed in the southern states and outlawed in most of the northern states. Buying into the reparations argument suggests that the antebellum South was rich and the slave-starved North was poor. The truth is just the opposite. In fact, the poorest states and regions of our country were places where slavery flourished: Mississippi, Alabama and Georgia. And the richest states and regions were those where slavery was absent: Pennsylvania, New York and Massachusetts.

The reparations movement would be an amusing sideshow were it not for its damaging distractions. It grossly misallocates resources that could be better spent elsewhere. According to the state Department of Education, 75% of black California boys cannot meet state reading standards. In 2016, in 13 of Baltimore’s 39 high schools, not a single student scored proficient on the state’s mathematics exam. In six other high schools, only 1% tested proficient in math. The same story of low education outcomes can be told about most cities with large black populations. I’d like to see lawyers bring class-action suits against public school systems in cities like Philadelphia, Baltimore, Washington, Detroit and Los Angeles for conferring fraudulent high school diplomas. Such diplomas attest a 12th-grade level of academic achievement when in fact those youngsters often cannot perform at sixth- or seventh-grade levels…

As of 2014, U.S. taxpayers have spent $22 trillion on Lyndon Johnson’s War on Poverty (in constant 2012 dollars). Adjusting for inflation, that’s three times more than was spent on all military wars since the American Revolution. If money alone were the answer, the many issues facing a large segment of the black community would have been solved.

There’s another possible reparations issue completely ignored: Blacks as well as whites live on land taken, sometimes brutally, from American Indians. Do blacks and whites owe American Indians anything?

Be seeing you

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Coulter: The Whole Folk Tale and Nothing but the Folk Tale | Breitbart

Posted by M. C. on June 6, 2019

“When I disagree with a rational man, I let reality be our final arbiter; if I am right, he will learn; if I am wrong, I will; one of us will win, but both will profit.”

Ayn Rand

https://www.breitbart.com/politics/2019/06/05/coulter-the-whole-folk-tale-and-nothing-but-the-folk-tale/

by ANN COULTER

New York City public school teachers recently revealed that they have been instructed to reject “objectivity,” “written documentation” and “perfectionism” by Schools Chancellor Richard Carranza, as part of his effort to “dismantle racism.” Carranza identified these values as tools of the “white-supremacy culture.”

Our cultural overlords are way ahead of Carranza. With lightning speed, we’ve abandoned old, hidebound, Anglo-Saxon facts-and-evidence standards in deference to new, fresh African folk tale standards. (According to J. Bekunuru Kubayanda, writing in the Afro-Hispanic Review, even Latin America and the Caribbean got their oral history traditions from Africa.) 

Thus, for example, Gen. Robert E. Lee has been re-invented as a white genocidal lunatic. Meanwhile, actual tape-recorded evidence of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. engaging in sex orgies will not put a dent in his hero status. 

Michael Korda, a lion of the New York literary set, published an admiring biography of Lee just five years ago, Clouds of Glory: The Life and Legend of Robert E. Lee. His book received a favorable review in The New York Times, which chirped that Korda portrayed Lee as a “master strategist” who was “physically fearless.” 

How can it be that the longtime editor-in-chief of Simon & Schuster and author of dozens of books — not to mention The New York Times itself — totally missed that Lee was a vicious racist, with no redeeming qualities whatsoever? Thank God Nikki Haley’s parents emigrated here from India so she could set Korda straight on this country’s history!

(Here’s an interesting fact about Lee: After graduating second in his class at West Point, he spent several decades overseeing the construction of fortifications on our borders. He rose to fame during the war with — GUESS WHO? — Mexico! Wasn’t it great when our military defended our country?) 

Two weeks ago, David Garrow, the Pulitzer Prize-winning King biographer, revealed shocking facts about the civil rights leader, based on extensive FBI notes on the wiretaps of his hotel rooms. In addition to King’s endless orgies with prostitutes, lesbians, ministers and parishioners, Garrow reports that King “looked on, laughed and offered advice” as one minister forcibly raped a parishioner. 

If any confederate cavalryman had behaved like King, Lee would have had him shot. American folk tale version-cum-Revealed Truth: Lee is Hitler. King is a saint. 

It took The New York Times a mere two weeks to report on Garrow’s mind-blowing article — an article he had offered to the Times (and dozens of other outlets), but which the newspaper declined to print. 

The Times’ eventual acknowledgment of Garrow’s groundbreaking research began with a column titled, “A Black Feminist’s Response to Attacks on Martin Luther King Jr.’s Legacy.” The author attacked Garrow’s “irresponsible account, drawn from questionable documents.” (Yes, that would be the treacherous “written documentation”!) 

This was followed by a news story on Garrow’s findings that bristled with denunciations of … the rapey minister? NO! Denunciations of Garrow for reporting what his research had uncovered. The Times even resurrected a 2002 incident at Emory Law School when Garrow was accused of abusively grabbing the wrists of a school official. 

Wikipedia has still not added the new information to King’s entry. Folk tales take precedence over the written documentation favored by “white-supremacy culture.” 

In our new objectivity-free country, it was an act of indisputable racism for Trump to question whether President Obama was born in America. He may as well have screamed the N-word. 

Even Trump’s loyal little defender, presidential adviser Jared Kushner, refused to deny in an interview this week that Trump’s “birtherism” was racist. (No wonder his father-in-law thinks he’s a girl.)…

This week, the “oral tradition” of the Central Park wilding as told in the debut of Ava DuVernay’s Netflix series, “When They See Us,” forced the chief sorcerer — er, prosecutor — Linda Fairstein to resign from the boards of three charities and Vassar College. As one of the convicted, then “exonerated,” rapists said, “Even if it’s 30 years later, she has to pay for her crime.” 

The actual evidence against the convicted rapists was, and remains, overwhelming, as I have described repeatedly in columns and in my book, Demonic: How the Liberal Mob Is Endangering America. Evidently, I will be forced to continue restating the facts periodically, in some third-world version of Nietzsche’s eternal recurrence. 

In our new country, nonsense like “objectivity” and “written documentation” are mere tricks, chicanery, hocus-pocus, used against “communities of color” — as Schools Chancellor Carranza explained — in order “to win victories for white people.”

Be seeing you

How To Prevent Another Militarized Police Massacre ...

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Daytime Juvenile Detention and Propaganda Centers – LewRockwell

Posted by M. C. on January 16, 2017

https://www.lewrockwell.com/2017/01/james-ostrowski/daytime-juvenile-detention-propaganda-centers/

Conservatives, like 90 percent of Americans, have been captured by the progressive ideology that has ruled the country for the last 100 years.  That being the case, they are reluctant to draw the obvious conclusions: government schools are bad for your kids; they can’t be fixed; they can’t be reformed; and the only solution is to your pull your kids out now.

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