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Posts Tagged ‘Department of Defense’

Erie Times E-Edition Article-‘They didn’t want to cause a panic’

Posted by M. C. on July 13, 2021

I’ll bet. Between the ‘rona, and war with China and Russia and white supremacy we have enough man made (up) crisis. We don’t need alien crisis.

This has always been treated as a joke by the MSM and government.

Why the fuss and why now? It makes you wonder from what are they are trying to distract US?

https://erietimes-pa-app.newsmemory.com/?publink=094f67339_1345e3d

Brian Broom Mississippi Clarion Ledger USA TODAY NETWORK An anticipated preliminary report from the federal government was recently released on UFOs encountered by military personnel dating back to 2004, and its contents, or lack thereof, has some Mississippians upset.

While the report doesn’t deny some may be extraterrestrial lifeforms traveling to Earth, it doesn’t offer that as a possible explanation, either.

‘I don’t believe they’re being straight up,’ Calvin Parker said. ‘The Department of Defense could come a little cleaner about what they’ve got. I just really believe there’s more out there than what they’re saying.’

Parker was a part of one of history’s most famous UFO cases. He, along with now-deceased Charles Hickson, claimed they were abducted by aliens the night of Oct.11, 1973, while fishing from a bank of the Pascagoula River. The two said they were levitated by aliens into a football-shaped craft, examined and then released.

The two contacted the Jackson County Sheriff’s Office and reported the incident. According to Parker, the two passed sobriety tests as well as polygraph tests. Parker said he also passed a voice stress test.

Parker remained largely quiet about the event until he wrote a book in 2018 giving his account of what happened and later a second book.

The report was released to the public on June 25 by the Office of the Director of National Intelligence and refers to UFOs as Unidentified Aerial Phenomena. In Preliminary Assessment: Unidentified Aerial Phenomena, the Pentagon’s Unidentified Aerial Phenomena Task Force gives an overview of 144 observations by U.S. government sources.

One object was determined to be a partially deflated balloon and 80 of the observations involved multiple sensors. In a handful of cases, advanced technology appeared to have been demonstrated.

‘In 18 incidents, described in 21 reports, observers reported unusual UAP movement patterns or flight characteristics,’ the report stated. ‘Some UAP appeared to remain stationary in winds aloft, move against the wind, maneuver abruptly, or move at considerable speed, without discernible means of propulsion. In a small number of cases, military aircraft systems processed radio frequency (RF) energy associated with UAP sightings.’

The report indicated the observations could likely be explained by five possible things: airborne clutter, natural atmospheric phenomena, U.S. government or industry developmental programs, foreign adversary systems, and a catchall ‘other’ bin – but no mention of extraterrestrial crafts.

Parker said the investigations and report are too little, too late.

‘They’re just trying to satisfy everybody by telling them just a little bit,’ Parker said. ‘They should have done this a long time ago.

‘I think they probably did, but didn’t want to tell it. They didn’t want to cause a panic.’

Rosey Nail is also unhappy with the report.

Nail was hundreds of miles away from Pascagoula the night Hickson and Parker said they were abducted but said she witnessed something that was not from this world.

Nail said she saw a light moving across the sky that night and it separated into two lights. One orb moved closer to her and became as large as the sun and began changing colors. It then rejoined the other object and shot out of sight. It was an event she said isn’t explained by any possibilities in the report.

‘It was other-worldly, whatever that encompasses,’ Nail said. ‘It was purposeful.

‘It maneuvered. It went up and down and it went sideways and it shot up in the sky. I don’t think it’s military of any country. I think with technology advances, they would know if it was from other countries. Whatever the truth is, I think we should know about it.’

Maria Blair and her late husband, Jerry Blair, of Alabama, were on the opposite side of the Pascagoula River from Hickson and Parker on Oct.11, 1973.

In an earlier interview, the two said they watched a blue light move across the sky and hover before it landed about 150 to 200 yards away.

Jerry was waiting for a boat to pick him up to take him to his job offshore and paid little attention to the light as his thoughts were on work.

When the boat arrived, Maria said she heard a splash in the water as she walked down the pier. She looked down and saw what looked like a person in a wet suit in the water. After she heard Parker’s description of the aliens he said he was abducted by, she said it matched what she saw.

After watching television newscasts and learning the report did not offer alien lifeforms as a possible explanation, Blair, like Parker, said government officials are withholding information.

‘Ever since that night in 1973, the world knows we’re not alone,’ Blair said. ‘The government knows we’re not alone.

‘These humanoids are not from other countries. They’re so more advanced than us. I’ve never gotten over what I saw that night. These humanoids are not from this earth.’

The report is preliminary, which suggests a second is expected, but when and if it will be released to the public was not included in the document. Parker, who’s 67 and battling health issues, said he hopes more information is released that will shed light on what he and Hickson said happened them, but he’s not sure if it will.

‘I wish they’d tell us so I can go to my grave knowing what they know,’ Parker said. ‘I’d just like to have some kind of answer before I die and that’s not a long ways away, but I don’t think we’re going to get it from Congress or the Department of Defense.’

Photographed on the Pascagoula River where he and now-deceased Charles Hickson said they were abducted by aliens in 1973, Calvin Parker said he doesn’t believe a new government report on unidentified aerial phenomena reflects everything the government knows about UFOs. Provided

Photographed on the Pascagoula River where he and now-deceased Charles Hickson said they were abducted by aliens in 1973, Calvin Parker said he doesn’t believe a new government report on unidentified aerial phenomena reflects everything the government knows about UFOs.

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How the Pentagon failed to sell Afghan government’s bunk ‘Bountygate’ story to US intelligence agencies  | The Grayzone

Posted by M. C. on July 11, 2020

The Times reported first on June 28, then again on June 30, that a large amount of cash found at a “Taliban outpost” or a “Taliban site” had led U.S. intelligence to suspect the Russian plot.  But the Times had to walk that claim back, revealing on July 1 that the raid that turned up $500,000 in cash had in fact targeted the Kabul home of Rahmatullah Azizi, an Afghan businessmen said to have been involved in both drug trafficking and contracting for part of the billions of dollars the United States spent on construction projects.

https://thegrayzone.com/2020/07/07/pentagon-afghan-bountygate-us-intelligence-agencies/

Another New York Times Russiagate bombshell turns out to be a dud, as dodgy stories spun out by Afghan intelligence and exploited by the Pentagon ultimately failed to convince US intelligence agencies.

By Gareth Porter

The New York Times dropped another Russiagate bombshell on June 26 with a sensational front-page story headlined, “Russia Secretly Offered Afghan Militants Bounties to Kill U.S. Troops, Intelligence Says.”  A predictable media and political frenzy followed, reviving the anti-Russian hysteria that has excited the Beltway establishment for the past four years.

But a closer look at the reporting by the Times and other mainstream outlets vying to confirm its coverage reveals another scandal not unlike Russiagate itself: the core elements of the story appear to have been fabricated by Afghan government intelligence to derail a potential US troop withdrawal from the country. And they were leaked to the Times and other outlets by US national security state officials who shared an agenda with their Afghan allies.

In the days following the story’s publication, the maneuvers of the Afghan regime and US national security bureaucracy encountered an unexpected political obstacle: US intelligence agencies began offering a series of low confidence assessments in the Afghan government’s self-interested intelligence claims, judging them to be highly suspect at best, and altogether bogus at worst.

In light of this dramatic development, the Times’ initial report appears to have been the product of a sensationalistic disinformation dump aimed at prolonging the failed Afghan war in the face of President Donald Trump’s plans to withdraw US troops from it.

The Times quietly reveals its own sources’ falsehoods

The Times not only broke the Bountygate story but commissioned squads of reporters comprising nine different correspondents to write eight articles hyping the supposed scandal in the course of eight days. Its coverage displayed the paper’s usual habit of regurgitating bits of dubious information furnished to its correspondents by faceless national security sources. In the days after the Times’ dramatic publication, its correspondent squads were forced to revise the story line to correct an account that ultimately turned out to be false on practically every important point.

The Bountygate saga began on June 26, with a Times report declaring, “The United States concluded months ago” that the Russians “had covertly offered rewards for successful attacks last year.” The report suggested that US intelligence analysts had reached a firm conclusion on Russian bounties as early as January. A follow-up Times report portrayed the shocking discovery of the lurid Russian plot thanks to the recovery of a large amount of U.S. cash from a “raid on a Taliban outpost.” That article sourced its claim to the interrogations of “captured Afghan militants and criminals.”

However, subsequent reporting revealed that the “US intelligence reports” about a Russian plot to distribute bounties through Afghan middlemen were not generated by US intelligence at all.

The Times reported first on June 28, then again on June 30, that a large amount of cash found at a “Taliban outpost” or a “Taliban site” had led U.S. intelligence to suspect the Russian plot.  But the Times had to walk that claim back, revealing on July 1 that the raid that turned up $500,000 in cash had in fact targeted the Kabul home of Rahmatullah Azizi, an Afghan businessmen said to have been involved in both drug trafficking and contracting for part of the billions of dollars the United States spent on construction projects.

The Times also disclosed that the information provided by “captured militants and criminals” under “interrogation” had been the main source of suspicion of a Russian bounty scheme in Afghanistan. But those “militants and criminals” turned out to be thirteen relatives and business associates of the businessman whose house was raided.

The Times reported that those detainees were arrested and interrogated following the January 2020 raids based on suspicions by Afghan intelligence that they belonged to a “ring of middlemen” operating between the Russian GRU and so-called “Taliban-linked militants,” as Afghan sources made clear.

Furthermore, contrary to the initial report by the Times, those raids had actually been carried out exclusively by the Afghan intelligence service known as the National Directorate of Security (NDS). The Times disclosed this on July 1. Indeed, the interrogation of those detained in the raids was carried out by the NDS, which explains why the Times reporting referred repeatedly to “interrogations” without ever explaining who actually did the questioning.

Given the notorious record of the NDS, it must be assumed that its interrogators used torture or at least the threat of it to obtain accounts from the detainees that would support the Afghan government’s narrative. Both the Toronto Globe and Mail and the United Nations Assistance Mission in Afghanistan (UNAMA) have documented as recently as 2019 the frequent use of torture by the NDS to obtain information from detainees.  The primary objective of the NDS was to establish an air of plausibility around the claim that the fugitive businessman Azizi was the main “middleman” for a purported GRU scheme to offer bounties for killing Americans.

NDS clearly fashioned its story to suit the sensibilities of the U.S. national security state. The narrative echoed previous intelligence reports about Russian bounties in Afghanistan that circulated in early 2019, and which were even discussed at NSC meetings. Nothing was done about these reports, however, because nothing had been confirmed.

The idea that hardcore Taliban fighters needed or wanted foreign money to kill American invaders could have been dismissed on its face. So Afghan officials spun out claims that Russian bounties were paid to incentivize violence by “militants and criminals” supposedly “linked” to the Taliban.

These elements zeroed in on the April 2019 IED attack on a vehicle near the U.S. military base at Bagram in Parwan province that killed three US Marines, insisting that the Taliban had paid local criminal networks in the region to carry out attacks.

As former Parwan police chief Gen. Zaman Mamozai told the Times, Taliban commanders were based in only two of the province’s ten districts, forcing them to depend on a wider network of non-Taliban killers-for-hire to carry out attacks elsewhere in the province. These areas included the region around Bagram, according to the Afghan government’s argument.

But Dr. Thomas H. Johnson of the Naval Postgraduate School, a leading expert on insurgency and counter-insurgency in Afghanistan who has been researching war in the country for three decades,  dismissed the idea that the Taliban would need a criminal network to operate effectively in Parwan.

“The Taliban are all over Parwan,” Johnson stated in an interview with The Grayzone, observing that its fighters had repeatedly carried out attacks on or near the Bagram base throughout the war.

With withdrawal looming, the national security state plays its Bountygate card

Senior U.S. national security officials had clear ulterior motives for embracing the dubious NDS narrative. More than anything, those officials were determined to scuttle Trump’s push for a complete withdrawal from Afghanistan. For Pentagon brass and civilian leadership, the fear of withdrawal became more acute in early 2020 as Trump began to demand an even more rapid timetable for a complete pullout than the 12-14 months being negotiated with the Taliban.

It was little surprise then that this element leapt at the opportunity to exploit the self-interested claims by the Afghan NDS to serve its own agenda, especially as the November election loomed. The Times even cited one “senior [US] official” musing that “the evidence about Russia could have threatened that [Afghanistan] deal, because it suggested that after eighteen year of war, Mr. Trump was letting Russia chase the last American troops out of the country.”

In fact, the intelligence reporting from the CIA Station in Kabul on the NDS Russia bounty claims was included in the Presidential Daily Brief (PDB) on or about February 27 — just as the negotiation of the U.S. peace agreement with the Taliban was about to be signed. That was too late to prevent the signing but timed well enough to ratchet up pressure on Trump to back away from his threat to pull all US troops out of Afghanistan.

Trump may have been briefed orally on the issue at the time, but even if he had not been, the presence of a summary description of the intelligence in the PDB could obviously have been used to embarrass him on Afghanistan by leaking it to the media.

According to Ray McGovern, a former CIA official who was responsible for preparing the PDB for Presidents Ronald Reagan and George H.W. Bush, the insertion of raw, unconfirmed intelligence from a self-interested Afghan intelligence agency into the PDB was a departure from normal practice.

Unless it was a two or three-sentence summary of a current intelligence report, McGovern explained, an item in the PDB normally involved only important intelligence that had been confirmed.  Furthermore, according to McGovern, PDB items are normally shorter versions of items prepared the same day as part of the CIA’s “World Intelligence Review” or “WIRe.”

Information about the purported Russian bounty scheme, however, was not part of the WIRe until May 4, well over two months later, according to the Times. That discrepancy added weight to the suggestion that the CIA had political motivations for planting the raw NDS reporting in the PDB before it could be evaluated.

This June, Trump’s National Security Council (NSC) convened a meeting to discuss the intelligence report, officials told the Times. NSC members drew up a range of options in response to the alleged Russian plot, from a diplomatic protest to more forceful responses. Any public indication that US troops in Afghanistan had been targeted by Russian spies would have inevitably threatened Trump’s plan for withdrawal from Afghanistan.

At some point in the weeks that followed, the CIA, Defense Intelligence Agency and National Security Agency each undertook evaluations of the Afghan intelligence claims. Once the Times began publishing stories about the issue, Director of National Intelligence John Ratcliffe directed the National Intelligence Council, which is responsible for managing all common intelligence community assessments, to write a memorandum summarizing the intelligence organizations’ conclusions.

The memorandum revealed that the intelligence agencies were not impressed with what they’d seen. The CIA and National Counter-Terrorism Center (NCTC) each gave the NDS intelligence an assessment of “moderate confidence,” according to memorandum.

An official guide to intelligence community terminology used by policymakers to determine how much they should rely on assessments indicates that “moderate confidence” generally indicates that “the information being used in the analysis may be interpreted in various ways….” It was hardly a ringing endorsement of the NDS intelligence when the CIA and NCTC arrived at this finding.

The assessment by the National Security Agency was even more important, given that it had obtained intercepts of electronic data on financial transfers “from a bank account controlled by Russia’s military intelligence agency to a Taliban-linked account,” according to the Times’ sources.  But the NSA evidently had no idea what the transfers related to, and essentially disavowed the information from the Afghan intelligence agency.

The NIC memorandum reported that NSA gave the information from Afghan intelligence “low confidence” — the lowest of the three possible levels of confidence used in the intelligence community.  According to the official guide to intelligence community terminology, that meant that “information used in the analysis is scant, questionable, fragmented, or that solid analytical conclusions cannot be inferred from the information.”

Other intelligence agencies reportedly assigned “low confidence” to the information as well, according to the memorandum. Even the Defense Intelligence Agency, known for its tendency to issue alarmist warnings about activities by US adversaries, found no evidence in the material linking the Kremlin to any bounty offers.

Less than two weeks after the Times rolled out its supposed bombshell on Russian bounties, relying entirely on national security officials pushing their own bureaucratic interests on Afghanistan, the story was effectively discredited by the intelligence community itself. In a healthy political climate, this would have produced a major setback for the elements determined to keep US troops entrenched in Afghanistan.

But the political hysteria generated by the Times and the hyper-partisan elements triggered by the appearance of another sordid Trump-Putin connection easily overwhelmed the countervailing facts. It was all the Pentagon and its bureaucratic allies needed to push back on plans for a speedy withdrawal from a long and costly war.

Gareth Porter

Gareth Porter is an independent investigative journalist who has covered national security policy since 2005 and was the recipient of Gellhorn Prize for Journalism in 2012.  His most recent book is The CIA Insider’s Guide to the Iran Crisis co-authored with John Kiriakou, just published in February.

 

 

 

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Genetically Modified Seeds: Conceived as a Weapon – Global ResearchGlobal Research – Centre for Research on Globalization

Posted by M. C. on February 18, 2020

…that the vault was created as a storehouse for lethal biological pathogens, the DNA of which can be combined with GM seed and unleashed anywhere with the help of these same seed companies. No other use would explain the list of participants or the need for the remote location and virtually nuclear-proof security.

https://www.globalresearch.ca/genetically-modified-seeds-conceived-weapon/5703004

GM seeds and GM food carry great risks for all nations, so much so that for many reasons it is probably imperative these foods be banned outright. This subject is too large to be discussed here, but one aspect requires brief notice. If we were to ask about the origin of GM seeds, how the idea was conceived and developed, who did the research and who provided the funding, how would we reply? We might reasonably suggest that perhaps the concept originated in the Biology or Agricultural Department of some university, or that a government lab doing research on food supplies might have conceived and pursued the idea. Or, we might suggest a private company in the agricultural field was looking for more productive varieties of grains and stumbled on this process.

We might suggest all those answers, but in each case we would be wrong. GM seed was conceived, promoted, researched and funded by the US Department of Defense – the American War Department. GM seed was never meant as a way to feed the hungry, but was instead conceived and developed as a weapon or, more precisely, as a weapons-delivery system. Genetically-Modified seed was never intended to support human life, but to eliminate it.

GM seed is neither more productive nor healthier than traditional heritage crops, and is far more expensive and destructive, but it presents almost irresistible military advantages against any nation that becomes dependent on this source of food grains. One is that the US can use it as a political weapon, refusing to supply seed to a disfavored nation, perhaps causing widespread famine and dislocation. The other is more sinister, in that many groups have experimented with gene-splicing technology, inserting unrelated DNA into various seeds.

In one case in Canada, a government department discovered an “anti-freeze” gene contained in the blood of fish living in Arctic waters, permitting them to survive in waters of sub-zero temperature. (20) The scientists spliced this gene into Canadian wheat crops, permitting the wheat to withstand freezing temperatures without damage. Monsanto also forced these genes into tomatoes, resulting in the first GMO tomato. (21) An American research lab spliced the genes from fireflies into tobacco plants, producing a tobacco field that glowed in the dark. (22)

These examples may be harmless, but others are much less so. The US Defense Department has invested huge sums in research directed to splicing lethal genes into these GM crop seeds, including smallpox, bird and swine flu viruses, coronaviruses, the plague, AIDS, and more. As a military weapon, such science is priceless. Why begin a shooting war when Monsanto or Cargill can sell rice, corn and soybeans that contain smallpox, H5N1, or a coronavirus? When the seed is harvested and passes into the nation’s food supply it could, within weeks, exterminate 50% or more of the population without firing a single shot.

And this was precisely the reason GM seed was conceived and developed by the Americans. It is a weapon of war, designed and meant to deliver to a nation’s entire population a lethal virus or other disease, to literally exterminate an enemy with no risk to the aggressor. Many scientists and US military documents have demonstrated that seeds are far cheaper and much more effective than bombs in the search for military domination. One such military document I’ve discussed elsewhere stated the cost per death of an enemy population by nuclear, conventional and biological weapons, the latter being orders of magnitude less than the former.

In 2001 scientists at the Epicyte bio-lab in San Diego created a GM contraceptive corn, having discovered a rare class of human antibodies that attack sperm. Their researchers isolated the genes that regulate the manufacture of these antibodies and inserted them into corn plants, creating horticultural factories that make contraceptives. (23) (24) Shortly after the 2001 Epicyte press release, all discussion of the breakthrough vanished. The company was taken over by Biolex and nothing more was heard in any media about the development of spermicidal corn. Epicyte, DuPont and Syngenta (sponsors of the Svalbard Seed Vault) had a joint venture to share and use this technology. Silvia Ribeiro, of the NGO ETC Group, warned in a column in the Mexican daily La Jornada, that “The potential of spermicidal corn as a biological weapon is very high”, and reminisced about the use of forced sterilizations against indigenous peoples.

The Doomsday Seed Vault at Svalbard

A new and serious cause for concern is the recently-announced seed vault built on a piece of barren rock named Svalbard, which is owned by Norway, is very remote near the North Pole, and virtually inaccessible. According to press releases, this seed vault has dual blast-proof doors with motion sensors, two airlocks, and walls of steel-reinforced concrete one meter thick. There are no full-time staff, but the vault’s relative inaccessibility will facilitate monitoring any human activity. The stated purpose is to store the entire world’s heritage seeds so that crop diversity can be saved for the future, but that crop diversity is already “saved”, stored in vaults all around the world. What do these people foresee, that such a remote and secure facility should be developed?

The promoters and financiers of this venture are the same people who control the world’s GM seeds and who have been among the most outspoken proponents of drastically reducing the world’s population: the Rockefeller and Gates Foundations, Syngenta, DuPont, Monsanto and CGIAR. These are the same people who are actively destroying crop diversity all over the planet. Why would they suddenly get religion and decide to save in Norway the same seeds they are destroying everywhere else?

Some time ago, William Engdahl wrote an excellently researched article on this subject of the seed vault and arrived at the same conclusion, that the vault was created as a storehouse for lethal biological pathogens, the DNA of which can be combined with GM seed and unleashed anywhere with the help of these same seed companies. No other use would explain the list of participants or the need for the remote location and virtually nuclear-proof security. Engdahl asked, “Is it a coincidence that these same organizations, from Norway to the Rockefeller Foundation to the World Bank are also involved in the Svalbard seed bank project?” (25)

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Larry Romanoff is a retired management consultant and businessman. He has held senior executive positions in international consulting firms, and owned an international import-export business. He has been a visiting professor at Shanghai’s Fudan University, presenting case studies in international affairs to senior EMBA classes. Mr. Romanoff lives in Shanghai and is currently writing a series of ten books generally related to China and the West. He can be contacted at: 2186604556@qq.com

Notes

(20) https://www.mun.ca/research/explore/publications/rmatters/june_96/antifrez.html

(21) https://www.motherearthnews.com/real-food/adding-a-fish-gene-into-tomatoes-zmaz00amzgoe

(22) http://content.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,143840,00.html

(23) GM corn set to stop man spreading his seed; https://www.theguardian.com/science/2001/sep/09/gm.food

(24) https://www.democraticunderground.com/discuss/duboard.php?az=view_all&address=104×3738803

(25) https://www.globalresearch.ca/doomsday-seed-vault-in-the-arctic-2/23503

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Test your GMO knowledge - Institute for Responsible Technology

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Want To Save The Environment? De-Fund The Pentagon. – Caitlin Johnstone

Posted by M. C. on September 30, 2019

We know that our oligarchic empire will do literally anything, up to and including murdering a million Iraqis, to secure control over energy resources. We know this with absolute certainty.

https://caitlinjohnstone.com/2019/09/28/want-to-save-the-environment-de-fund-the-pentagon/

Millions of people are uniting in demonstrations worldwide against our civilization’s ecocidal march toward extinction, which makes me so happy to see. It’s really encouraging to see so many young people burning with love for their planet and a hunger to reverse the damage that has been done to our ecosystem by the refusal of previous generations to turn away from our path of devastation. This must continue if we are to survive as a species.

The challenge now is the same perennial challenge which comes up every single time there is a massive and enthusiastic push from the public in a direction that is healthy: such movements always, without exception, become targeted for manipulation by establishment interests. I write all the time about how this has happened with the intrinsically healthy impulse of feminism; I just finished watching an MSNBC pundit proclaim that anyone who still supports Bernie Sanders over Elizabeth Warren is a sexist. This corralling of healthy energy into the advancement of corrupt establishment interests happens with feminism, it happens with the healthy fight against racism and antisemitism, and of course it happens with environmentalism.

Of course it does. People get very emotional when you say this, even if you fully support environmentalism and don’t have any objections to the overall scientific consensus about what’s happening to our environment, but environmentalism is not destined to be the one and only popular movement which establishment interests don’t move mountains to co-opt.

We know that our oligarchic empire will do literally anything, up to and including murdering a million Iraqis, to secure control over energy resources. We know this with absolute certainty. Therefore we can also know with certainty that they are working to ensure that when new energy systems are put in place, they are put in place in a way which allows the oligarchs to retain their power, and ideally to expand it, without losing their thrones to rival plutocrats, to governments, or (worst case scenario) to the rank-and-file public gaining control over their own energy. This agenda is on the table. It is happening.

The ruling elites have many advantages over us, but one of the greatest is the fact that they know exactly what they want and exactly where they’re trying to push things, whereas we the general public, on average, do not. If we only had one positive anti-establishment direction to push in there’d be no stopping us, and as soon as we find one the oligarchs will be done. But in general and on average what we have is a few clear ideas about what we don’t want and a great many vague, frequently contradictory ideas about what we do want. This lack of clarity in direction always leaves us highly susceptible to the influence of any well-funded narrative manager who steps forward to say “Oh yeah I know exactly where we’re going! It’s this way, follow me!”

Luckily for us, there’s a very clear demand we can add into the mix in this new push for environmentalist reforms which runs directly counter to the interests of the empire that is trying to manipulate our healthy impulses: de-fund the Pentagon.

There is no single, unified entity that is a larger polluter than America’s dishonestly labeled “Department of Defense”. Its yearly carbon output alone dwarfs that of entire first-world nations like Sweden and Portugal; if the US military were its own country it would rank 47th among emitters of greenhouse gasses, meaning it’s a worse polluter than over 140 entire nations. That’s completely separate from the pollution already produced by the US itself. None of the sociopathic corporations whose environmental impact is being rightly criticized today come anywhere remotely close to that of the Pentagon. They are going under the radar.

And that’s just greenhouse gas emissions, which the Pentagon’s poisonous effects on our environment are in no way limited to. As journalist Whitney Webb highlighted in an excellent article for Mintpress News about the wildly neglected subject of the US military’s ecological toxicity: “Producing more hazardous waste than the five largest US chemical companies combined, the US Department of Defense has left its toxic legacy throughout the world in the form of depleted uranium, oil, jet fuel, pesticides, defoliants like Agent Orange and lead, among others.”

Webb documents how the US “has conducted more nuclear weapons tests than all other nations combined”, how US military interventionism in Iraq “has resulted in the desertification of 90 percent of Iraqi territory, crippling the country’s agricultural industry and forcing it to import more than 80 percent of its food,” and how “US military bases, both domestic and foreign, consistently rank among some of the most polluted places in the world.”

“While the US military’s past environmental record suggests that its current policies are not sustainable, this has by no means dissuaded the US military from openly planning future contamination of the environment through misguided waste disposal efforts,” Webb writes. “Last November, the US Navy announced its plan to release 20,000 tons of environmental ‘stressors,’ including heavy metals and explosives, into the coastal waters of the US Pacific Northwest over the course of this year.”

This is all a massive environmental burden to take on for a branch of the government which provides no other service to anyone beyond bullying the rest of the world into obedience, wouldn’t you agree? So get rid of it.

Surely with all this talk about the huge, sweeping changes that are required to avert climate catastrophe we’re not going to overlook the world’s single worst polluter just because a few think tankers and their plutocratic sponsors believe it’s important for the US-centralized power alliance to retain total global hegemony? If we’re making huge, sweeping changes, the completely needless globe-spanning US war machine would be the obvious place to start.

That’s something we can inject into the mainstream dialogue as this environmental movement grows, and the cool thing about it is that the establishment manipulators can’t reject it or they’ll expose themselves. It’s something we can demand that they can’t legitimately say no to. We can surf this clear, concrete, exciting and utterly indisputable idea on the surging momentum of these climate demonstrations, and the same healthy impulse to save our planet that these budding activists are now embodying will lift it right up and carry it to the top of mainstream awareness. No sane person will reject this, so if anyone pushes back against it to say “No, not that,” they’ll immediately spotlight the insane agendas they serve.

The US does not need any more military power than what other normal nations have: enough to defend its own easily defended shores from unprovoked attack. Anything beyond that, and certainly the hundreds of environmentally toxic military bases circling our planet, exists solely for the benefit of murderous dominating imperialists and sociopathic war profiteers. Demanding a reversal of US military expansionism as a part of the environmental movement is sane on its face and will benefit everyone, and it will also help highlight all unwholesome elements of empire loyalism.

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Veterans Exposed to Burn Pits Wait for Lawsuit Decision ...

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Amazon Offered Job to Pentagon Official Involved With $10 Billion Contract It Sought

Posted by M. C. on June 4, 2019

The Washington Lagoon is filled with ugly creatures.

https://theintercept.com/2019/06/03/amazon-defense-department-jedi-contract/

In a federal lawsuit, the tech giant Oracle has provided new details to support its accusation that Amazon secretly negotiated a job offer with a then-Department of Defense official who helped shape the procurement process for a massive federal contract for which Amazon was a key bidder.

Amazon Web Services and Microsoft are now the two finalists to win the highly contested $10 billion contract for what is known as the Joint Enterprise Defense Infrastructure, or JEDI. The deal, one of the largest federal contracts in U.S. history, would pay one company to provide cloud computing services in support of Defense Department operations around the world.

But the contract has been hotly contested since the department began soliciting proposals last year. Two of Amazon’s competitors, IBM and Oracle, filed complaints with the Government Accountability Office saying that the winner-take-all process unfairly favored Amazon, which is seen as an industry leader in cloud computing. When its claim was rejected, Oracle sued the government in the U.S. Court of Federal Claims.

Since the court battle began in 2018, Oracle has aggressively lodged conflict-of-interest accusations involving a former DOD official named Deap Ubhi, who left the department in 2017 to take a job at Amazon. In a court motion filed on Friday, Oracle alleged that while Ubhi worked on the preliminary research for the JEDI program in the late summer and fall of 2017, he was also engaged in a secret job negotiation with Amazon for months, complete with salary discussions, offers of signing bonuses, and lucrative stock options.

The motion further alleges that Ubhi did not recuse himself from the JEDI program until weeks after verbally accepting a job offer from Amazon and that he continued to receive information about Amazon’s competitors and participate in meetings about technical requirements, despite a government regulation that forbids such conflicts of interest…

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10 Aquatic Facts About 'Creature From the Black Lagoon ...

 

 

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Department Of Defense Training Exercise Terrifies Unprepared Totowa, N.J. Residents

Posted by M. C. on May 3, 2018

The question should be why is the military training in a US civilian area.

The answer is obvious.  The population wasn’t meant to know then and won’t when it is for real.

Department Of Defense Training Exercise Terrifies Unprepared Totowa, N.J. Residents

It started off as a well-kept secret, but the explosions and helicopters ended up giving it away.

Members of the U.S. Department of Defense were conducting training recently in a New Jersey neighborhood, and the result was plenty of residents with frayed nerves, CBS2’s Dick Brennan reported Wednesday… Read the rest of this entry »

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“Notwithstanding”: How Congress Enabled Chuck Hagel and Ash Carter to Keep Child Rape and Torture from Disrupting Forever War – emptywheel

Posted by M. C. on January 27, 2018

Can’t let minor annoyances get in the way of the racket that is war.

https://www.emptywheel.net/2018/01/23/notwithstanding-how-congress-enabled-chuck-hagel-and-ash-carter-to-keep-child-rape-and-torture-from-disrupting-forever-war/

…Chuck Hagel and Ash Carter were fully aware of gross human rights abuses, including both child rape and torture, but elected to use the blunt tool that Congress had given them to ignore these human rights abuses and continue funding the same units within the Afghan military that carried out the abuses. So while official policy was that abuses are to be reported, they then are completely ignored at the Congressional and Cabinet level in order to continue a forever war that is forever failing.

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The Slow Poisoning of Our Soldiers, Families on U.S. Bases | The American Conservative

Posted by M. C. on September 8, 2017

The parasite killing it’s host.

http://www.theamericanconservative.com/articles/poisoning-our-soldiers-and-families-on-u-s-bases/

Why has the military waited this long to address water contamination?

While it is generally understood that the U.S. Armed Forces are among the world’s largest polluters, it is not generally recognized that some of the most significant pollution occurs here in the United States at military bases and facilities.

According to an explosive report by the Center for Public Integrity in August, polluted water and soil have been found at approximately 400 active and closed military bases in the United States. Of these, 149 have been designated Superfund Sites by the U.S. Environmental Protection Administration (EPA) under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA). Read the rest of this entry »

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