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Posts Tagged ‘New York’

Proposed Bill Bans Body Armor, Makes Possession a Crime, Forces Citizens to Turn it In or Face Arrest – Activist Post

Posted by M. C. on January 7, 2021

The armor is purely defensive in nature, and people should always have the ability and right to defend themselves against attack.

The right to self-defense is the right from which all other rights are derived. As John Locke stated, self-defense is the first law of nature. Each person owns his or her own life and no other person has a right to take that life, or hinder the preservation thereof.

When seconds count…you’re screwed.

https://www.activistpost.com/2021/01/proposed-bill-bans-body-armor-makes-possession-a-crime-forces-citizens-to-turn-it-in-or-face-arrest.html

By Matt Agorist

Lawmakers in New York have proposed one of the most tyrannical and utterly worrisome pieces of legislation we’ve seen. They want to ban citizens from having body armor to protect themselves from bullets. As no one has ever beaten anyone to death with a bullet proof vest, the intentions behind this bill are clear and have no other purpose other than making it easier for government to kill citizens and harder for citizens to protect themselves from bullets.

New York, which has some of the strictest gun laws in the country, now wants to make it a misdemeanor and potential felony for people to purchase or possess a passive means of resistance to bullets.

Unlike other attempts to ban body armor like we’ve seen in the past, this bill does not grandfather people in who already own it. In fact, the bill says that it must be turned over to the state for disposal, or you are guilty. After the passage of the bill, citizens will have 15 days to turn it in before they are declared criminals.

Assembly Bill A352 was introduced and cosponsored by David McDonough, Richard Gottfried, and Michael Montesano. It reads as follows (emphasis added.)

§ 270.21 Unlawful purchase or possession of a body vest. A person is guilty of the unlawful purchase or possession of a body vest when he or she knowingly and unlawfully purchases or possesses a body vest, as such term is defined in subdivision two of section 270.20 of this article. This section shall not apply to active law enforcement officers or those whose occupations require the use of body vests as determined by the department of state.

Unlawful purchase or possession of a body vest is a class A misdemeanor for a first offense and a class E felony for any subsequent offense.

§ 2.  Any person currently in possession of a body vest, as such term is defined in subdivision two of section 270.20 of the penal law, shall have 15 days from the effective date of this act to dispose of such body vest at any local or state law enforcement agency.

On the government’s website, they allow comments from citizens. Naturally, this piece of legislation is not being well received. One person pointed out the obvious, saying, “The only legitimate reason for this bill is to make it easier for the State to murder the disarmed subjects of New York.”

“I cannot believe that such a bill would even be introduced in our state. The government here wants to control every aspect of our lives, even such a purely defensive item. Shame on our lawmakers for even considering such a bill,” another commenter wrote.

“This is a vile and wicked bill! Body armor is the most passive form of self protection possible that a person can use and you want to take that away from law-abiding citizens?! You should be disgusted with yourselves for ever proposing such a thing!” another person pointed out.

We agree with all of them.

The reality is America has less major crime than at any point in the last 40 years, and yet we have cops patrolling American streets as if they are in the Korengal or Fallujah, and treating the citizens as such, with absolutely no regard for the Constitution.

Perhaps if these lawmakers put as much effort into disarming the overly militarized police, as attempting to take away law-abiding citizens’ ability to defend themselves from would-be shooters, people wouldn’t have the impetus to wear body armor.

The armor is purely defensive in nature, and people should always have the ability and right to defend themselves against attack.

The right to self-defense is the right from which all other rights are derived. As John Locke stated, self-defense is the first law of nature. Each person owns his or her own life and no other person has a right to take that life, or hinder the preservation thereof.

Moreover, the Supreme Court has held that the police have no duty to protect citizens, so that responsibility now falls squarely on the shoulders of individuals themselves.

To take away people’s ability to access defensive armor, after telling them that they are on their own and are owed no protection by law enforcement, almost seems like a cruel joke.

Why should a law-abiding American, who takes steps to defend themselves passively, be criminalized?

Where is the sense in government banning something that provides people protection from harm?

The logic of this bill is so askew that it wouldn’t be surprising if perhaps next they will try and pass a bill that outlaws hiding behind things while being shot at.

When the state attempts to make it illegal to protect yourself from bullets, it may be time to start purchasing gear to protect yourself from bullets.

Source: The Free Thought Project

Matt Agorist is an honorably discharged veteran of the USMC and former intelligence operator directly tasked by the NSA. This prior experience gives him unique insight into the world of government corruption and the American police state. Agorist has been an independent journalist for over a decade and has been featured on mainstream networks around the world. Agorist is also the Editor at Large at the Free Thought Project. Follow @MattAgorist on Twitter, Steemit, and now on Minds.

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New York can’t buy its way out of blackouts – Watts Up With That?

Posted by M. C. on December 26, 2020

All of this battery backup hype is a scam, and not just in New York either. The papers are full of this con, from coast to coast. The utilities know perfectly well that these loudly touted battery buys are a hoax, but they are getting rich building the wind and solar systems the politicians are calling for.

The voters are oblivious to these impossible numbers, since they are told that intermittent wind and solar are cheaper than reliable coal, gas and nuclear. Only when the sun shines bright and the wind blows hard, which is not all that often.

https://wattsupwiththat.com/2020/12/24/new-york-cant-buy-its-way-out-of-blackouts/

By David Wojick

New York City will soon be home to the world’s biggest utility-scale battery system, designed to back up its growing reliance on intermittent renewables. At 400 MWh this batch of batteries will be more than triple the 129 MWh world leader in Australia.

The City of New York’s director of sustainability (I am not making this title up), Mark Chambers, is ecstatic, bragging: “Expanding battery storage is a critical part of how we advance momentum to confront the climate emergency while meeting the energy needs of all New Yorkers. Today’s announcement demonstrates how we can deliver this need at significant scale.” (Emphasis added)

In reality the scale here is incredibly insignificant.

In the same nonsensical way, Tim Cawley, the president of Con Edison, New York’s power utility, gushes thus: “Utility scale battery storage will play a vital role in New Yorks clean energy future, especially in New York City where it will help to maximize the benefit of the wind power being developed offshore.”

This puts the Con in Con Edison.

Here is the reality when it comes to the scale needed to reliably back up intermittent renewables. For simplicity let us suppose New York City is 100% wind powered. Including solar in the generating mix makes it more complicated but does not change the unhappy outcome very much.

NYC presently peaks at around 32,000 MW needed to keep the lights on. If Mr. Biden makes all the cars and trucks electric it might be closer to 50,000 MW but let’s stick to reality.

This peak occurs during summer heat waves which are caused by stagnant high pressure systems called Bermuda highs. These highs often last for a week and because they are stagnant there is no wind power generation. Wind turbines require something like sustained winds of 10 mph to move the blades and more like a whistling 30 mph to generate full power. During a Bermuda high folks are happy to get the occasional 5 mph breeze. These huge highs cover many states so it is not like we can get the juice from next door.

So for reliability we need, say, seven days of backup, which is 168 hours. Here’s the math:

32,000 MW x 168 hours = 5,376,000 MWh of stored juice needed to just make it.  Mind you for normal reliability we usually add 20% or so. Did I mention electric cars?

It is easy to see that a trivial 400 MWh is not “significant scale.” It is infinitesimal scale. Nothing. Nada. Might as well not exist.

[I estimate 45 seconds of backup power from the facility. Someone correct me if I’m wrong~CR]

More specifically, 5,376,000 divided by 400 = 13,440 so only 13,439 more to go.

On the other hand, this measly 400 MWh battery array may well cost half a billion dollars, which is significant, especially to the New Yorkers who will pay for it. No cost figures are given because the system is privately owned, but EIA reports that the average utility scale battery system runs around $1.5 million a MWh of storage capacity. That works out to $600 million for this insignificant toy.

So what would it cost to reliably back up wind power, at this MWh cost and NYC’s scale? Just over $8,000,000,000,000 or EIGHT TRILLION DOLLARS. I have not seen this stupendous sum mentioned in the media. Perhaps Con Ed has not mentioned it.

Then too, New York State has the same problem. Only much bigger if New York City is included, which it often is.

But hey, maybe the cost will come down a few trillion. Not if we create a seller’s market by rushing into intermittent renewables, which is certainly where we are headed. After all, this is just New York City. Imagine what backing up America with batteries might cost. Don’t bother because it is impossible.

I should also add that we have no idea how to make 5 million MWh of batteries work together. The tiny 400 will be a challenge. It may not be possible.

Maybe fracked geothermal, the reliable renewable, is the answer. Or how about coal, oil, gas and nuclear power? Too bad they are all out of fashion.

All of this battery backup hype is a scam, and not just in New York either. The papers are full of this con, from coast to coast. The utilities know perfectly well that these loudly touted battery buys are a hoax, but they are getting rich building the wind and solar systems the politicians are calling for.

The voters are oblivious to these impossible numbers, since they are told that intermittent wind and solar are cheaper than reliable coal, gas and nuclear. Only when the sun shines bright and the wind blows hard, which is not all that often.

Reality is just sitting there, waiting. It can’t work so it won’t work. At this point it is just a question of how and when we find out the hard way

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Determined To Kill Businesses That Survived Lockdowns, New York Plans Minimum Wage Hike Later This Month

Posted by M. C. on December 18, 2020

I might buy some moving company stock.

Eric Boehm

In an apparent effort to finish off the businesses that survived the nightmare that was 2020, New York will go ahead with a planned minimum wage increase at the end of the month.

The New York Department of Labor announced Wednesday that it will move forward with plans to hike the state’s minimum wage on December 31. Under the state’s phased-in minimum wage increase that started in 2016, businesses in New York City are already required to pay workers a minimum of $15 per hour. On December 31, the minimum wage in Long Island and Westchester County will increase by $1 to $14 per hour, and the minimum wage across the rest of the state will jump from $11.80 to $12.50 per hour.

The Labor Department had considered postponing the minimum wage hikes in light of the COVID-19 pandemic and associated government-mandated shutdowns that have crushed businesses across New York. The unemployment rate in New York state has been above 10 percent nearly every month since March, and as many as one-third of New York City’s small businesses may have permanently closed due to the pandemic. With new statewide economic lockdowns announced in recent weeks (and Gov. Andrew Cuomo threatening even more in the near future), those figures are likely to get gloomier before they improve.

Seems like a great time to make it more expensive to employ people, right?

Greg Biryla, New York director of the National Federation of Independent Business (NFIB), told the Rochester Democrat & Chronicle that the Cuomo administration’s reasoning for approving the minimum wage hike “defies logic.” Even with assistance from the state and federal governments, 39 percent of NFIB members say they could be out of business in the next year.

The infuriating thing is that the state is well aware of the additional burden it is creating—the Cuomo administration just doesn’t seem to care. A report commissioned by the labor department to review the potential costs of hiking the state’s minimum wage in the middle of a pandemic and economic crisis notes that “COVID-19 has dramatically changed the economic landscape, casting doubt on whether the capacity to absorb minimum wage increases without adverse impact can continue over the near-term.”

But the analysts add that “Anecdotally, our research has found examples of job openings upstate offering wages well above $12.50,” and conclude that “these examples could be interpreted as evidence that upstate businesses are able to offer the wages necessary to attract the workers they need.”

Yes, they discard piles of actual economic data because they found anecdotal evidence that businesses can afford to pay higher wages—and so all must.

F. A. Hayek famously wrote that politicians and bureaucrats will always lack the necessary knowledge to run the economy as well as the market can. That’s often true. But here’s an example of bureaucrats having all the information necessary to make what should be a very easy decision to postpone a minimum wage hike until the pandemic passes and unemployment falls—and the amount of knowledge doesn’t matter as long as Cuomo’s administration is determined to ignore reality.

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Thanks to Lockdowns, American Big Cities May Not Be Worth the Trouble Anymore | Mises Wire

Posted by M. C. on December 5, 2020

Here’s the history lesson: Chicago was one of scores of cow towns turned trading posts in the West whose fortunes rested with their leaders’ ability to attract capital from the East; namely, from New York, Boston, and Philadelphia banks. A founder and the first mayor of the city, William Butler Ogden, an Easterner himself, knew that if Chicago was to be great (that means rich), it could not default on loans provided to the city’s enterprises and entrepreneurs during the epic Panic of 1837. In other words, Ogden tasked himself with making sure that Chicago did not become the equivalent of a third-world, capital-starved nation among many other cities vying to become America’s next top metropolis. He had some convincing to do. The easy road would have been default and run.

https://mises.org/wire/thanks-lockdowns-american-big-cities-may-not-be-worth-trouble-anymore

Gary Richied

All due deference to Jerry Seinfeld, the man who is one of the geniuses behind the greatest American sitcom about nothing, but in the recent war/argument/discussion/exchange over the status and future of New York City, it is hard to award dear Jerry with a win.Seinfeld took to the New York Times (only the sophistication of the old Gray Lady would do) to upbraid former Manhattan comedy club owner and entrepreneur James Altucher for declaring the New York as they once knew it, well, dead.

Frankly, Altucher makes a compelling case for this time being different than other seemingly existential threats of the past that might have appeared to compel the city that never sleeps to do just that—for good. For Altucher, the heavy, onerous arm and boot of government have become too much for New Yorkers—residents and businesses alike—to bear. The covid hysteria, inept lockdowns, and mismanagement by the likes of DeBlasio, Cuomo, and their sycophant ninnies have all led to, not only the snuffing out of the entrepreneurial spirit but very much destroyed, in the most direct means imaginable, the enterprises themselves. Back that up with the New York police being ordered to stand down in front of BLM and Antifa rioters (and asinine Ruth Bader Ginsberg riots?!) looting stores and burning down their fronts, and the civil authorities have not held up their end of even the corrupt Rousseauan social contract.

Altucher is not the only sensible one to leave New York for greener and warmer pastures—many have, are, and will be doing so in the future. Thus, what New York and other massive cities in the United States like my own formerly fair Chicago now face is a retraction of what had characterized the past few decades of people of means moving back into the inner cities. Cities gentrified. Formerly unattractive and even dangerous neighborhoods received an injection of interest and capital, and of course, the requisite Starbucks. Hipster artist types faux lamented the increase of “balconization” as ever-increasing lofts and condos with balconies dotted the new façades of old buildings. To be sure, they did not seem to recognize that loss of traditional, cultural neighborhood identification came with all of their suburban friends moving into the place as they sipped their chais and waxed unpoetic about how horrible all of the capitalism was from their iPhones.

Hypocrites and the genuine alike enjoyed and even relished the comforts of urban living. The museums and parks were within walking distance. Amazing restaurants. Easy Uber to sporting events. A new local favorite pub.

Now, pandemic hysteria and race riots have exposed the latent sore. Without the culture, the life, the hum, and the energy of the city, without the shopping and walks, the theater or a ball game, city life now has all of the dangers and inconveniences and none of the comforts. High taxes, potholed roads, homeless encampments, no parking, and violent crime have rendered city life rather unlivable. And to the politicians who have long contributed to cities’ deterioration and the squandering of those previous local tax windfalls, shame on you—but the problem lies with the voters who put them into power.

Will these same citizens be able to muster enough intestinal fortitude to resurrect these cities with much-needed integrity and sacrifice? Will the Phoenix City (Chicago’s actual nickname) rise again? I don’t think so. We are witnessing the effects of a long and sustained decline. Contrast the culture of the city of Chicago today (or insert your city name here) with that of the founders of the city back in 1837. Here’s the history lesson: Chicago was one of scores of cow towns turned trading posts in the West whose fortunes rested with their leaders’ ability to attract capital from the East; namely, from New York, Boston, and Philadelphia banks. A founder and the first mayor of the city, William Butler Ogden, an Easterner himself, knew that if Chicago was to be great (that means rich), it could not default on loans provided to the city’s enterprises and entrepreneurs during the epic Panic of 1837. In other words, Ogden tasked himself with making sure that Chicago did not become the equivalent of a third-world, capital-starved nation among many other cities vying to become America’s next top metropolis. He had some convincing to do. The easy road would have been default and run.

Ogden advocated for the opposite as a public gathering convened intent on debt relief. From historian Donald Miller:

The crisis peaked when large numbers of the city’s frightened debtors organized a mass movement for relief from their financial obligations. A public meeting was called to have “stay laws” passed for the suspension of court action on the collection of debts. “Inflammatory speeches greatly excited and made desperate many of the crowd, and everything looked as if dishonor would crown the city’s brow,” said an early city historian. At that point, Ogden stepped forward to address the crowd, his first and only public talk as mayor. Speaking in cool, reasoned tones, he urged his fellow citizens to have the “courage of men” and to remember “that no misfortune [is] so great as one’s own personal dishonor….Above all things…do not tarnish the honor of our infant city.” Ogden’s measured eloquence carried the meeting. Efforts to repudiate debts were voted down, and Chicago emerged with its credit image intact. Later, this allowed Ogden to help put together a bond and loan package with Arthur Bronson and other outside investors that allowed the state to resume canal construction in 1845.

Our contemporary urbanites do not—as a habit—display anything remotely akin to personal responsibility or the “courage of men.” That would require some tough love about lowering collective time preference and ending the expectation that government can and will save the day. Blue city mayors and blue state governors instead have their hands out to Congress and the Fed, begging them to bail them out of decades of disastrous, self-inflicted policies.

As a libertarian an-cap, I have no team in the fight, red or blue. However, I do hope that the red state politicos have enough gumption and sense to understand that no promises, no kickbacks are worth bailing out the criminal blue politicians and their constituents. Those are very, very bad loans that no bankers in 1837 or 2020, for that matter, would issue.

And, who cares about L.A.?! As a comely and insightful British lass exclaimed to me in Nice, France, in 1998: “Californians couldn’t grow culture in a Petri dish!”

As true then as it is now.

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EconomicPolicyJournal.com: Rents Plunge in San Francisco and New York

Posted by M. C. on September 6, 2020

https://www.economicpolicyjournal.com/2020/09/rents-plunge-in-san-francisco-and-new.html

Rents Plunge in San Francisco and New York

Here are the latest numbers from Zumper through the end of August.

Table from WolfStreet

It is an escape from the big blue cities.

Check out Ft. Lauderdale, prices are up by 5.6% year-over-year.

RW

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New York’s Big Brother Has Gone Bananas – American Thinker

Posted by M. C. on August 29, 2020

The tourist destinations in the mountain states are thriving.  Missouri’s Lake of the Ozarks is reportedly doing twice its annual business.  New York State is withering.  Not since Saddam taunted the U.S. into invading Iraq has the world seen so self-destructive a case of narcissism.

https://www.americanthinker.com/articles/2020/08/new_yorks_big_brother_has_gone_bananas.html

By Jack Cashill

In reading the New York State travel advisory, I am reminded of one of my favorite scenes from a Woody Allen movie, this one from Bananas.  Having ascended to power, the dictatorial rebel leader Esposito announces his new rules for San Marcos:

From this day on, the official language of San Marcos will be Swedish. … In addition to that, all citizens will be required to change their underwear every half-hour. Underwear will be worn on the outside so we can check. Furthermore, all children under 16 years old are now…16 years old!

Woody’s character Fielding Mellish cracks, “What’s the Spanish word for straitjacket?”  The Spanish word is camisa de fuerza.  The Swedish word is tvångströja.  In any language, Gov. Andrew Cuomo surely needs one.  It is bad enough that he is running the state by executive order.  Worse is that the orders are nuts.  If Woody Allen were to make a comic version of 1984, he could model “Big Brother” on Andrew Cuomo.

Last week, I flew into Buffalo.  It was my first flight this year into New York, a state in which I have owned a summer cottage for the last 30 years.  Coming from Missouri, a state on New York’s travel advisory, I had to fill out a two-sided form promising that I would quarantine in place for 14 days.  As if.

Missouri has had about 25 COVID-19 deaths per 100,00 people.  New York has had about 165.  In the western part of Missouri where I live, the rate is considerably lower.  No matter.  By some perverse calculation, my return to New York threatened to put the state’s residents at some elevated risk.

To visit my own cottage, I had to promise not to be in public or otherwise leave the quarters that they have identified as “suitable.”  These “quarters” — how quaint — had to have “separate bathroom facilities for each individual or family group.”  More than that, I had to have “access to a sink with soap and water, and paper towels.”

Esposito would have been hard pressed to imagine rules this absurd and unenforceable: “Food must be delivered to the individual’s quarters”; “Garbage must be bagged and left outside by the door of each of the quarters”; “Individuals should self-monitor for fever and other symptoms of COVID-19 daily.”

Big Brother Andy promises that “enforcement teams” will be stationed to “greet disembarking passengers to request proof of completion of the State Department of Health traveler form.”  He isn’t kidding.  My flight had no more than 20 people on board, but two officials were waiting at 9:00 P.M. on a Sunday night to collect our letters of transit.  The penalty for leaving the airport without completing the form is a $2,000 fine and a mandatory quarantine.  Knowing this, I filled mine out.  I wrote on it, “Under protest, self-destructive, wasteful, oppressive.”

My flight to Denver a week earlier was nearly full, but no one who did not have to come was coming to New York.  The state is broke and broken.  Yet it can still afford to create this Byzantine bureaucracy and impose it on those who are compelled to visit, even — hang on — those who drive to New York.  Decrees Big Brother: “Travelers coming to New York from designated states through other means of transport, including trains and cars, must fill out the form online.”

I know a conscientious fellow who did just that.  Health authorities contact him every day to check on his progress.  My friend was given a choice of call or text.  He chose text.  At the beginning, he was asked if he needed any help with food or medicine.  I asked my friend whether the State delivered pizza.  He chose not to inquire.  He was afraid they might.

The tourist destinations in the mountain states are thriving.  Missouri’s Lake of the Ozarks is reportedly doing twice its annual business.  New York State is withering.  Not since Saddam taunted the U.S. into invading Iraq has the world seen so self-destructive a case of narcissism.

Pay no attention to New York’s national dominance in COVID deaths.  Nursing homes?  What nursing homes?  I am convinced that Cuomo imposed the travel advisory to creates the illusion that he has so heroically purged his state of COVID that red-state refugees can only screw things up.  I suspect his forthcoming book — American Crisis: Leadership Lessons from the COVID-19 Pandemic — will assure at least the media that this is so.  (And who writes a book during a crisis?)

Come what may, Cuomo has an assured place in history.  He will be the first head of a state to enact a costly, self-defeating law that absolutely no one will follow and, quite likely, no one will be punished for not following.  San Marcos can use a man like that.

Jack Cashill’s new book, Unmasking Obama: The Fight to Tell the True Story of a Failed Presidency, is now widely available.  Also see http://www.Cashill.com.

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New York assembly Bill A99

Posted by M. C. on August 18, 2020

THE GOVERNOR OR HIS OR HER DELE- GEE, INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO THE COMMISSIONER OR THE HEADS OF LOCAL HEALTH DEPARTMENTS, MAY ORDER THE REMOVAL AND/OR DETENTION OF SUCH A PERSON OR OF A GROUP OF SUCH PERSONS BY ISSUING A SINGLE ORDER,
The governor decides who is sick and what can be done with them.
Imagine having Cuomo, Wolf or Newsom with you and your family’s life in their hands.
The New York assembly is OK with this. Tells you why those who can flee, are.
Note the bill is dated Jan 2019. Pre COVID!

Relates to the removal of cases, contacts and carriers of communicable diseases who are potentially dangerous to the public health

 

Introduced  by M. of A. PERRY -- read once and referred to the Committee
  on Health

AN ACT to amend the public health law, in relation  to  the  removal  of
  cases,  contacts  and carriers of communicable diseases who are poten-
  tially dangerous to the public health

  THE PEOPLE OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK, REPRESENTED IN SENATE AND  ASSEM-
BLY, DO ENACT AS FOLLOWS:

  Section  1.  The  public health law is amended by adding a new section
2120-a to read as follows:
  § 2120-A. REMOVAL AND DETENTION OF CASES, CONTACTS  AND  CARRIERS  WHO
ARE OR MAY BE A DANGER TO PUBLIC HEALTH; OTHER ORDERS. 1. THE PROVISIONS
OF  THIS  SECTION  SHALL  BE  UTILIZED  IN  THE  EVENT THAT THE GOVERNOR
DECLARES A STATE OF HEALTH EMERGENCY DUE TO AN EPIDEMIC OF ANY  COMMUNI-
CABLE DISEASE.
  2.  UPON  DETERMINING BY CLEAR AND CONVINCING EVIDENCE THAT THE HEALTH
OF OTHERS IS OR MAY BE ENDANGERED BY A  CASE,  CONTACT  OR  CARRIER,  OR
SUSPECTED  CASE, CONTACT OR CARRIER OF A CONTAGIOUS DISEASE THAT, IN THE
OPINION OF THE GOVERNOR, AFTER CONSULTATION WITH THE  COMMISSIONER,  MAY
POSE  AN  IMMINENT AND SIGNIFICANT THREAT TO THE PUBLIC HEALTH RESULTING
IN SEVERE MORBIDITY OR HIGH MORTALITY, THE GOVERNOR OR HIS OR HER  DELE-
GEE,  INCLUDING,  BUT  NOT  LIMITED  TO THE COMMISSIONER OR THE HEADS OF
LOCAL HEALTH DEPARTMENTS, MAY ORDER THE REMOVAL AND/OR DETENTION OF SUCH
A PERSON OR OF A GROUP OF SUCH PERSONS BY ISSUING A SINGLE ORDER,  IDEN-
TIFYING  SUCH  PERSONS  EITHER  BY  NAME  OR  BY  A  REASONABLY SPECIFIC
DESCRIPTION OF THE INDIVIDUALS OR GROUP BEING DETAINED. SUCH  PERSON  OR
GROUP OF PERSONS SHALL BE DETAINED IN A MEDICAL FACILITY OR OTHER APPRO-
PRIATE  FACILITY  OR  PREMISES  DESIGNATED BY THE GOVERNOR OR HIS OR HER
DELEGEE AND COMPLYING WITH SUBDIVISION FIVE OF THIS SECTION.
  3. A PERSON OR GROUP REMOVED OR DETAINED BY ORDER OF THE  GOVERNOR  OR
HIS  OR HER DELEGEE PURSUANT TO SUBDIVISION TWO OF THIS SECTION SHALL BE

 EXPLANATION--Matter in ITALICS (underscored) is new; matter in brackets

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New York vs. Texas: NY Has Nearly 50 Times More COVID-19 Deaths Per Capita | Mises Wire

Posted by M. C. on April 29, 2020

Many states now report total deaths per 100,000 that are
one-thirtieth the size of New York’s toll. Texas, for instance, reports
total deaths numbering 2.3 per 100,000. The total in South Dakota, which
has been much maligned for not imposing any statewide lockdowns, is 1.2
deaths per 100,000.

Were New York a foreign country, the US’s total death rate from COVID-19 would be cut by 36 percent:

The truth, of course, is that these statements by politicians and government “experts” were attempts to justify extreme government edicts that have created widespread unemployment, poverty, child abuse, and illness. They are irresponsible scare tactics employed for political purposes, and were never based on any actual evidence or knowledge about the situation. After all, these officials don’t even know the fatality rate of COVID-19.

https://mises.org/wire/new-york-vs-texas-ny-has-nearly-50-times-more-covid-19-deaths-capita?utm_source=Mises+Institute+Subscriptions&utm_campaign=da4fb45608-EMAIL_CAMPAIGN_9_21_2018_9_59_COPY_01&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_8b52b2e1c0-da4fb45608-228343965

As of April 26, there were nearly 55,000 COVID-19 deaths reported in the United States. Of those, more than 22,000 (or about 40 percent) were in the state of New York alone. New Jersey was in second place, with nearly 5,900 COVID-19 deaths reported.

If we combine these two states, we find that a majority of COVID-19 deaths in the United States have come from them alone. Combined, these two states accounted for more than 51 percent (28,213) of all deaths, while all other states combined made up less than 48.5 percent (or 26,567) of deaths.

ny

Measured in terms of deaths per 100,000, New York (114 per 100,000) and New Jersey (66 per 100,000) also had the highest rates. But New York had the worst rate by far.

New York’s number of deaths per 100,000 soars above those of all other states, is double that of Massachusetts, and is more than seven times those of Maryland and Pennsylvania.

The difference becomes even more stark as we move west and south. New York’s death rate is now 22 times as large as Florida’s and 25 times that of Alabama.

compared

Many states now report total deaths per 100,000 that are one-thirtieth the size of New York’s toll. Texas, for instance, reports total deaths numbering 2.3 per 100,000. The total in South Dakota, which has been much maligned for not imposing any statewide lockdowns, is 1.2 deaths per 100,000.

Were New York a foreign country, the US’s total death rate from COVID-19 would be cut by 36 percent:

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Whenever comparisons of this sort are made, however, many claim that all areas of the country will closely follow in New York’s footsteps unless ever more strict lockdown measures are taken immediately.

Indeed, we’ve been hearing for weeks that various states and regions are just “two weeks behind New York” in terms of COVID-19 infections and deaths.

For example, more than a month ago, the Philadelphia Inquirer on March 27 quoted one medical expert claiming: “We anticipate we are no more than two weeks behind New York City….Cases are doubling every two to three days. We had 46 confirmed cases last night. You do the math.”

Also in Pennsylvania, a medical expert from Lehigh Valley on March 22 insisted that “we are two weeks behind Manhattan in terms of spread and seriousness.”

On April 3, Maryland governor Larry Hogan proclaimed that his state was “about two weeks behind New York.”

Meanwhile, on April 1 WBHM reported that an Alabama health official had claimed: “Birmingham is about two weeks behind New York City.” Nearly a month later, Jefferson County, Alabama, where Birmingham sits, reports a death rate of 5 per 100,000, or 4 percent the size of New York’s death rate.

When we note outlandishly incorrect predictions such as these, a common response from lockdown boosters is “Well, social distancing prevented that!”

But did it?

So far, there’s no empirical evidence even showing that social distancing works. As T.J. Rodgers wrote in the Wall Street Journal this week, there is no correlation between government-forced “shutdowns” and a muted number of deaths from COVID-19:

No conclusions can be drawn about the states that sheltered quickly, because their death rates ran the full gamut, from 20 per million in Oregon to 360 in New York. This wide variation means that other variables—like population density or subway use—were more important. Our correlation coefficient for per-capita death rates vs. the population density was 44%. That suggests New York City might have benefited from its shutdown—but blindly copying New York’s policies in places with low Covid-19 death rates, such as my native Wisconsin, doesn’t make sense.

Similarly, political scientist Wilfred Reilly ran the numbers, taking into account factors such as population and population density. He found no evidence “that lockdowns are a more effective way of handling coronavirus than well-done social-distancing measures” and concluded:

The question the model set out to ask was whether lockdown states experience fewer Covid-19 cases and deaths than social-distancing states, adjusted for all of the above variables. The answer? No. The impact of state-response strategy on both my cases and deaths measures was utterly insignificant.

Moreover, the timing is less than convincing for the “lockdowns worked!” claims. For example, in the case of Maryland, the governor claimed, “we’re two weeks behind New York,” even after a stay-at-home order was in place. That is, his prediction assumed social distancing. Nearly a month later, Hogan was clearly very wrong.

In Alabama, on the other hand, a statewide stay-at-home order did not come down until thirteen days (i.e., nearly two weeks) after the New York lockdown. Had Alabama truly been “two weeks behind,” it would have already been nearly comparable to New York in its death rate by the time the order was implemented. Obviously, that didn’t happen.

The truth, of course, is that these statements by politicians and government “experts” were attempts to justify extreme government edicts that have created widespread unemployment, poverty, child abuse, and illness. They are irresponsible scare tactics employed for political purposes, and were never based on any actual evidence or knowledge about the situation. After all, these officials don’t even know the fatality rate of COVID-19.

Now, it’s entirely possible that as time progresses later waves of illness could increase total deaths, and there may be some “hot spots” where there are serious strains on the medical infrastructure. However, given the track record of the experts in predicting who is two weeks behind New York, it looks like it will only be a coincidence if these predictions of New York–like death rates prove correct at some point. Just as financial permabears often “predict ten of the last two recessions,” I have no doubt that many government-employed experts will predict twelve of the next three hot spots. Meanwhile, thanks to these experts’ recommendations, important medical procedures will be banned, people in need of medical care will be frightened into staying home, and food shortages may become a reality.

The real question we should be asking ourselves is why is New York is such a mess in terms of COVID-19? New York’s deaths aren’t just high by US standards. The state’s total deaths per 100,000 are higher than both Spain’s and Italy’s, both of which are considered to be among the most hard-hit countries on earth. New York has reported nearly as many COVID-19 deaths as Spain (23,500), even though Spain has a much larger population of 46 million. New York is also only about 5,000 deaths behind Italy, even though Italy has a population three times the size of New York State.

Indeed, these numbers are so high that one wonders if deaths are even being counted properly, or if there is something about New York’s medical infrastructure that is especially inferior. Perhaps New York is home to a particularly virulent strain of the disease. Perhaps the disease was in circulation for far longer than the experts insist is the case. The experts don’t know the answers to these questions.

Nor should we expect answers to these questions any time soon. But what we do know is that it strains the bounds of credibility to insist that South Dakota will soon be New York if it doesn’t impose similar lockdown measures. This doesn’t mean that no caution is warranted, or that high-risk populations should neglect social-distancing measures. But the claims that we’re all “two weeks behind New York” are neither accurate nor helpful.

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Lived 30 miles from NYC for a year. Manhattan, with its persistent aroma of sewage, packs and stacks 70,000 people per square mile.

After a year near Cesspool City, I was so ready to return to a West Coast county with fresh air and two people per square mile.

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Suspected robber ‘targeted four banks, was released under NY’s no-bail law, strikes A FIFTH time’ | Daily Mail Online

Posted by M. C. on January 13, 2020

New York is vying with London to become the most incompetantly run socialist city.

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-7877107/Suspected-robber-targeted-four-banks-released-NYs-no-bail-law-strikes-FIFTH-time.html

By Ralph R. Ortega For Dailymail.com

  • Gerold Woodberry, 42, is alleged to have robbed banks in New York’s Midtown Manhattan, Harlem, West Village and the Upper West Side, since December 30
  • He was accused of passing notes to tellers and got away with $1,000 twice before cops on patrol nabbed him on Thursday
  • But he was released under the city’s new ‘no bail law,’ which doesn’t require bail to hold a suspect accused of non-violent felonies, including robbery
  • ‘I can’t believe they let me out,’ sources said he boasted as he left the New York Police Department’s headquarters. ‘What were they thinking?’
  • Woodberry was then alleged to have robbed a fifth bank on Friday in Downtown Brooklyn, and the police have asked the public’s help in finding him

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Why These Five States Would Be Better Independent Countries | The Daily Bell

Posted by M. C. on December 1, 2019

Add New Jersey. Many of us Pennsylvanians would gladly add Philadelphia as an incentive.

https://www.thedailybell.com/all-articles/news-analysis/why-these-five-states-would-be-better-independent-countries/

By Joe Jarvis

Trump scares me. But progressives terrify me.

Whoever comes next will be more extreme than Bernie Sanders.

Californians may hate Donald Trump now. But you can bet Texans will hate whoever comes next.

The federal two-party system ensures a perpetually unhappy populace. Each tries to force their will on the other when it is “their turn.”

And the rest of us, who aren’t on one side or the other, constantly lose.

This is unneeded friction. Forced unity creates far more problems than it solves.

But why put up with the swaying whims of federal politics?

In America, we have a marketplace of 50 state governments lying in wait.

I moved from Massachusetts to Florida three years ago. The taxes are lower, the living is cheaper, the laws are less restrictive, there’s little traffic, and the weather is nicer.

But that didn’t allow me to escape the shadow of Washington DC.

But imagine if we could keep the ease of moving from state to state, but without the federal government following us.

States would sink or swim on their own merits. No help from DC. And no interference either…

Plus, not a single US state would even be close to the smallest country on earth, by population or land area. Much tinier countries do just fine on their own.

California has plenty of reason to become its own country. It is the most progressive state without much in common with DC or many other states.

Californians are still being prosecuted by the feds for owning state-legal marijuana dispensaries. California wants liberal immigration policy, while the US government thinks otherwise.

It’s also the most populous state. It would be the 36th largest country on earth by population. Larger than Canada, Saudi Arabia, and Poland. Slightly smaller than Spain, Argentina, and Ukraine.

California has the 5th largest economy in the world. That’s ahead of Great Britain despite having less than 2/3 the population.

Some states are net payers of federal taxes. They pay more to the federal government than they get back.

California receives $.99 in federal expenditures for every $1.00 it pays. That means it would hardly be affected financially by divorcing the US government. Overall California would keep 1% more money in the state without federal taxes and without federal programs.

Other estimates claim it is much worse, and California only gets 70 cents back on every dollar it sends to Washington DC.

An initiative Calexit wants a 2020 ballot question to ask Californians if they want to secede from the US. Louis Marinelli is the co-author of the initiative. Here’s his take:

[C]an you think of 25 red states that might like to see blue California secede? I can think of 30 that voted for Donald Trump.

Look, the United States claims to be the freest country in the world. We ought to enjoy the fundamental right of self-determination, and if we so determine, self-rule.

Then California can sign a military base agreement with the Americans to lease land for their existing bases. California will not be hostile towards them, but our immigrants will be protected from them.

Additionally, by keeping the tens (sometimes hundreds) of billions of dollars we lose each year supporting red states that hate California, we will reduce our debts, fund our liabilities, and provide every Californian with a debt-free college education and universal healthcare.

I personally think Cali’s high taxes, restrictive regulation, and overbearing laws are ridiculous.

But who am I to tell Californians that they can’t bankrupt their state? I’d prefer to have them govern themselves, especially if that meant California voters didn’t have control over me and my affairs.

California isn’t the only state where federal taxes and aid zero out. New York and Florida are also large population states with close to even return based on what they give to DC.

Florida has millions more residents than Chile or the Netherlands.

With no income tax, it is quite attractive to work there.

Plus Florida has the 17th largest economy on Earth, topping $1 trillion GDP (Gross Domestic Product).

That’s bigger than Turkey’s economy, despite having just a quarter of the population.

At just under 21 million inhabitants, Florida would be the 58th largest country on Earth by population.

New York would be 59th by population.

With the 15th largest economy, this is slightly smaller than Spain’s economy. Meanwhile, Spain has twice the population of New York. Clearly, New York is quite capable of operating as an independent nation.

Of course, New York City alone could be its own country. And then they wouldn’t be able to dictate oppressive urban laws to rural upstate New Yorkers.

Then again, NYC wealth is redistributed to other portions of the state…

This highlights the natural friction of grouping incompatible regions under one government.

 

Texas is another large state that would do just fine on its own. As a country, it would be 51st largest by population, larger than Australia.

Texas’ GDP of $1.6 trillion is also slightly larger than each of the Australian, Russian, and South Korean economies.

The size of the economy is on par with Canada. Yet Canada has almost 9 million more residents.

Only three states receive less money per person from federal expenditures than Texas. Texas takes in the fourth smallest amount of money per capita from the federal government.

Oh, and of course there’s that little fact that Texas was once an independent country.

It became its own country, called the Republic of Texas, from 1836 until it agreed to join the United States in 1845. Sixteen years later, it seceded along with 10 other states to form the Confederacy. The Civil War forced it back into the Union, where it has stayed ever since.

New Hampshire would be a relatively small country–a little bigger than Estonia in terms of population.

But New Hampshire would also be the richest country in the world.

At least among the OECD (Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development) countries. This list includes 34 of the most advanced countries like the USA, UK, Australia, Japan, Denmark, Israel, the Netherlands, Canada, Chile, etc.

Median income, adjusted for purchasing power, even puts New Hampshire ahead of Luxembourg, Norway, and Switzerland.

New Hampshire is another net payer of taxes. It gets about 70 cents back on every dollar it sends to DC.

New Hampshire also has a small secession movement. One organization is called the Foundation for New Hampshire Independence. Another calls itself NHexit.

A 2014 Reuters poll showed 23.9 percent of Americans would support their state peacefully seceding from the union if necessary, while 53.3 percent opposed the idea.

Secession

This list is far from complete.

For instance, Hawaii probably has the most legitimate reason of any state to secede. They were an independent Kingdom until 1893. The USA annexed Hawaii after the monarchy was overthrown.

Native Americans are another group who have a strong historical claim to independence.

And what’s Alaska still doing as part of the United States anyway? It isn’t even attached.

Being united by force just averages the good states with the bad. It means states can’t feel the full benefit of their good policies. It means they don’t suffer the full consequences of their failures.

It means wealth is redistributed. It means power is centralized. It means individuals have less control than they would over a smaller, more local government.

Forced unity eliminates the marketplace for the government. Let the states compete, and the best policies will rise to the top.

The American people will then truly have a choice and a voice in government.

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