MCViewPoint

Opinion from a Libertarian ViewPoint

Posts Tagged ‘tsa’

The TSA’s Secret Watchlist for Travelers Who Don’t Kowtow – The Future of Freedom Foundation

Posted by M. C. on February 15, 2019

Any woman who ever pushed a screener’s hands away from squeezing her breasts could also be guilty

Or perhaps the agency simply presumes that “it’s not an assault when federal agents do it.”

https://www.fff.org/explore-freedom/article/the-tsas-secret-watchlist-for-travelers-who-dont-kowtow/

by 

“I need a witness!” exclaimed the worried Transportation Security Administration screener at Reagan Washington National Airport a few months ago. Because I had forgotten to remove my belt before going through a TSA scanner, he explained that I must undergo an “enhanced patdown.” I told him that if he jammed my groin, I’d file a formal complaint against him. So he summoned his supervisor to keep an eye on the proceedings. After his white-suited boss arrived on the scene, I announced that I too, needed a witness. The boss bureaucrat assured me there was a video camera recording the scene. “But does it have audio?” I demanded to know. “That’s confidential security information,” he replied. “Ha! More like security theater,” I retorted.

I thought of this exchange when the New York Times revealed that the TSA has created a new secret watchlist for troublesome passengers. The TSA justifies the new list because TSA screeners were said to have been assaulted 34 times last year. “We were seeing an alarming increase in the number of assaults against our officers,” fretted Darby LaJoye, one of the TSA’s top security officials. TSA spokeswoman Lisa Farbstein declared, “TSA is committed to its people and wants to ensure there are safeguards in place to protect TSA officers and others from any individual who has previously exhibited disruptive or assaultive behavior at a screening checkpoint and is scheduled to fly.”

However, the TSA’s press office refused to release a list or any details of those assaults, including how many times accused assailants were arrested. The TSA also refused to answer my question: “How does TSA define an ‘assault’ on a TSA screener?” I was told I would need to file a Freedom of Information Act request for that information, but the TSA scorns federal law and often delays responses for months or years. Such tactics help explain why some people believe that “TSA” stands for “tactics to suppress accountability.”

Naturally, the TSA’s new official definition of “troublemaker” for this list goes far beyond people who slug screeners. Have you ever “loitered” near a checkpoint? Bingo. Any woman who ever pushed a screener’s hands away from squeezing her breasts could also be guilty — even though the TSA never formally promulgated its territorial claim to that part of the female anatomy… Read the rest of this entry »

Advertisements

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged: , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Government Shutdown Is the Best-Ever Argument for Privatization | The Nestmann Group

Posted by M. C. on February 7, 2019

So, if you enjoy being groped by TSA screeners, you’ll love dealing with the bureaucrats that will administer Medicare for all and free college. And you’ll enjoy paying their salaries with higher taxes even more. Have fun!

https://www.nestmann.com/government-shutdown-is-the-best-ever-argument-for-privatization

By Mark Nestmann

I was starting to feel sorry for the 800,000 federal employees who hadn’t received paychecks for more than a month. Then Donald Trump caved to the Democrats and ended the government shutdown last week.

There’s now a bipartisan effort in Congress to enact a law that would make government shutdowns less likely. But I have a much better and more permanent solution: privatize most of the functions that Uncle Sam’s intrepid bureaucrats perform.

Take the Transportation Security Administration (TSA), for instance. A big reason Trump ended the shutdown was that so many TSA employees had called in sick that flight delays were becoming intolerable. That wouldn’t have happened if the government hadn’t been in the airline security business.

Not that it’s doing an especially good job. In 2015, the TSA sent undercover agents to dozens of America’s largest airports to test security protocols. Shockingly, the agents were able to smuggle fake explosives or weapons through security checkpoints 95% of the time. The TSA failed in 67 out of 70 tests.

Two years later, the TSA tried again. The good news is that the failure rate fell from 95% to 70%. The bad news is … well, a 70% failure rate is nothing to celebrate.

One reason is the TSA performs so poorly is that the politicians in charge of our national security believe catering to lobbyists is more important than security.

Consider the saga of the Rapiscan scanner. Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged: , , , , | Leave a Comment »

How The Shutdown Can Be Used – LewRockwell

Posted by M. C. on January 12, 2019

https://www.lewrockwell.com/2019/01/allan-stevo/how-the-shutdown-can-be-used-to-make-air-travel-safer/

By 

We would never entrust a government functionary to secure the transport of valuable personal treasures like a Picasso or the Hope Diamond or a Faberge egg. There is a distinguished marketplace of professionals that handle that field far more adeptly. Then why do we trust a government functionary with securing our most vital form of long distance travel?

As all too many of us intimately recall, not only are planes able to be hijacked to the detriment of all on board, they can be used as guided missiles to the detriment of those on the ground, as was the case in the 9/11 attacks.

For some reason, rather than recognizing the failure of the quasi-governmental system and pushing government further out of the airline security process after the post 9/11 failures, we turned to the ever ineffective government to further step in to air travel security…

TSA Isn’t Doing Their Job, Isn’t Getting Paid, Now Is A Perfect Opportunity To Dissolve The TSA Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged: , , | 1 Comment »

How the government uses its giant facial recognition database | Sovereign Man

Posted by M. C. on November 2, 2018

Delta Airlines has even started testing a new program that scans your face prior to boarding your flight and matches it against this government database.

JetBlue has a similar program, and claims that “The customers are really delighted by it. . . they think it’s cool and they’re having fun.”

https://www.sovereignman.com/trends/how-the-government-uses-its-giant-facial-recognition-database-24263/

Simon Black

In July 1996, flight TWA 800 exploded in mid-air, 12 minutes after taking off from JFK International Airport in New York. All 230 passengers on board were killed.

It would be four years before an investigation concluded the likely cause of the explosion was a short circuit in the plane’s fuel tank.

But at the time, President Clinton felt the overwhelming need to do something.

People suspected terrorism. So Clinton issued new airport security rules.

From then on, identification was required to board an airplane.

Before that, you just needed a ticket.

After the attacks of September 11, 2001, airport security escalated.

The TSA (Transportation Security Administration) and DHS (Department of Homeland Security) were born.

Screening procedures intensified. Agents could now feel you up and down. Then came naked body scanners and the Real ID requirement.

Real ID standards were part of the post-9/11 security hysteria. But they are just now coming into full effect.

The federal guidelines require states to issue IDs that meet certain federal standards, or else the ID cannot be used for flying.

One of these standards is that the photo on the ID has to work with facial recognition systems.

CBP (Customs and Border Protection) has now completed a pilot program for using biometric data for boarding flights exiting the country. Biometric data includes unique identity markers like fingerprints, iris scans, and facial recognition.

The DHS audited the pilot program, and found that it was a success. They caught 1,300 people who had overstayed their visas.

Wait, what? I thought this was supposed to be about national security?

But that’s not what you get from the propaganda piece on the CBP’s websiteRead the rest of this entry »

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged: , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Apply the Christine Blasey Ford test to TSA’s sexual assault victims

Posted by M. C. on October 16, 2018

Do members of Congress care about any sexual assault that does not permit them to politically grandstand? 

As CNN political commentator Angela Rye wrote after her grueling experience with airport security, “Dear TSA: The country is not safer because you grab vaginas.”

https://www.usatoday.com/story/opinion/2018/10/15/christine-blasey-ford-test-tsa-victims-sexual-assault-patdown-column/1601134002/

James Bovard

Congress gives the Transportation Security Administration almost $8 billion a year and does nothing to constrain how TSA’s 43,000 screeners treat American travelers. A Justice Department lawyer insisted last year that there’s no law “establishing a specific degree of permissible intrusiveness of a (TSA) security screening pat-down.” Americans have no legal recourse regardless of how TSA’s screeners treat them, thus explaining why TSA pat-downs become more intrusive.

Dr. Jenn complained on Sept. 8: “Is it common practice for TSA agents to forcefully slide their hand up my (15-year-old) daughter’s inner leg and ending at her vagina? Literally slamming their hand into my daughter’s vagina.” Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged: , , | Leave a Comment »

TSA is secretly watching you in newest surveillance program

Posted by M. C. on August 3, 2018

In reality, anyone who refuses to kowtow to any command a TSA agent issues could be labeled a troublemaker.

In other words don’t pretend to have rights in front of a government lackey. A main activity of government programs is-thinking up ways to guarantee the program.

https://www.usatoday.com/story/opinion/2018/07/31/tsa-transportation-security-administration-secretly-watching-quiet-skies-surveillance-column/862810002/

James Bovard

Excessive yawning, strong body odor — these are two ways you could become a target in TSA’s new secret program, which treats ordinary people like terrorists.

If you fall asleep or use the bathroom during your next flight, those incriminating facts could be added to your federal dossier. Likewise, if you use your laptop or look at noisy children seated nearby with a “cold, penetrating stare,” that may be included on your permanent record. If you fidget, sweat or have “strong body odor” — BOOM! the feds are onto you.

Welcome to the latest profiling idiocy from the Transportation Security Administration. TSA’s Quiet Skies surveillance program is spurring federal air marshals to target dozens of Americans each day on the flimsiest of pretexts. The secret program, first exposed by Jana Winter in The Boston Globe, is security theater at its best…  Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged: , , , | Leave a Comment »

The Ron Paul Institute for Peace and Prosperity : Why Can’t We Sue the TSA For Assault?

Posted by M. C. on June 19, 2018

http://ronpaulinstitute.org/archives/featured-articles/2018/june/18/why-cant-we-sue-the-tsa-for-assault/

written by ron paul

When I was in Congress and had to regularly fly between DC and Texas, I was routinely subjected to invasive “pat-downs” (physical assaults) by the Transportation Security Administration (TSA). One time, exasperated with the constant insults to my privacy and dignity, I asked a TSA agent if he was proud to assault innocent Americans for a living.

I thought of this incident after learning that the TSA has been compiling a “troublesome passengers” list. The list includes those who have engaged in conduct judged to be “offensive and without legal justification” or disruptive of the “safe and effective completion of screening.” Libertarian journalist James Bovard recently pointed out that any woman who pushed a screener’s hands away from her breasts could be accused of disrupting the “safe and effective completion of screening.” Passengers like me who have expressed offense at TSA screeners are likely on the troublesome passengers list.written by ron paul Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged: , , , , | Leave a Comment »

After pointlessly groping countless Americans, the TSA is keeping a secret watchlist of those who fight back

Posted by M. C. on May 31, 2018

The watchlist would seem less perilous if the TSA were not one of most incompetent agencies on Earth. After a series of undercover tests at multiple airports across the country, the Department of Homeland Security concluded last year that TSA officers and equipment had failed to detect mock threats roughly 80% of the time.

http://www.latimes.com/opinion/op-ed/la-oe-bovard-tsa-watchlist-20180528-story.html

“I need a witness!” exclaimed the security screener at Ronald Reagan Washington National Airport. Because I had forgotten to remove my belt before going through a scanner, he explained, I must undergo an “enhanced patdown.” I told him that if he jammed his hand into my groin, I’d file a formal complaint. So he summoned his supervisor to keep an eye on the proceedings.

I thought of this exchange last week when the New York Times revealed that the Transportation Security Administration has created a secret watchlist for troublesome passengers. The TSA justified the list by saying that its screeners were assaulted 34 times last year, but did not release any details about the alleged assaults…

Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged: , , | Leave a Comment »

TSA Still Awful After 17 Years | Cato @ Liberty

Posted by M. C. on May 30, 2018

The problem is that monopoly bureaus like the Transportation Security Administration do not value Americans’ time, and they have little incentive to operate efficiently. 

https://www.cato.org/blog/tsa-still-awful-after-17-years

By CHRIS EDWARDS

It has been 17 years since the federal government took over security screening at the nation’s airports, and they still haven’t figured out how to schedule more screeners during busy times.

The photo is yesterday afternoon in Denver. It took 26 minutes to get through the line. Leaving from Dulles a couple days earlier it took a ridiculous 46 minutes. Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged: , | Leave a Comment »

TERMINAL MADNESS: What Is Airport Security?

Posted by M. C. on April 17, 2018

http://www.askthepilot.com/essaysandstories/terminal-madness/

– James Fallows, 

IN AMERICA AND ACROSS MUCH OF THE WORLD, the security enhancements put in place following the catastrophe of September 11, 2001, have been drastic and of two kinds: those practical and effective, and those irrational and pointless.

The first variety have taken place almost entirely behind the scenes. Comprehensive explosives scanning for checked luggage, for instance, was long overdue and is a welcome addition. It’s the second variety, unfortunately that has come to dominate the air travel experience. I’m talking about the frisking, X-raying, body scanning, and confiscating that goes on at thousands of concourse checkpoints across the globe — activities that by and large waste our time, waste our money, and humiliate millions of us on a daily basis.

Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged: , , , , , | Leave a Comment »