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Posts Tagged ‘Tom Wolf’

Erie Times E-Edition Article – No Sports For You!

Posted by M. C. on August 7, 2020

wolf

“We should avoid any congregate settings and that means anything that brings people together…”

The one true God said where two or more of you gather I will be with you.

The false god says where two or more of you gather I will smite you.

The opposite of the true God is…

Lavrentiy Beria says “Tommy, love the glasses dude”.

beria

https://erietimes-pa-app.newsmemory.com/?publink=0346b986c

PIAA ‘disappointed’ in governor’s recommendation, will meet Friday for further discussion

Gov. Tom Wolf announced on Thursday a recommendation to discontinue pre-K-12 school and recreational youth sports until at least the end of the year.

Wolf held a news conference Thursday morning and ended it abruptly after taking a question about whether he would allow spectators at high school sporting events this fall.

“We should avoid any congregate settings and that means anything that brings people together is going to help that virus get us. We should do everything we can to defeat the virus,” said Wolf when asked about no spectators at Pennsylvania Interscholastic Athletic Association events. “The guidance from us, the recommendation is that we don’t do any sports until Jan 1.”

Wolf walked away from the podium after finishing his answer to end the news conference. His office put out the recommendation in the middle of the afternoon.

The PIAA held an emergency meeting on Thursday afternoon in response to Wolf’s recommendation and guidance. The PIAA held a phone call with Wolf to try to change his mind, according to a report by the Pittsburgh Tribune Review.

“We are tremendously disappointed in this decision,” the PIAA said in a statement after its meeting. “Our member schools have worked diligently to develop health and safety plans to allow students the safe return to interscholastic athletics.”

The PIAA statement also said it will meet again on Friday afternoon to discuss the situation and will have another statement after the meeting.

The statement from Wolf’s office states that it is a “strong recommendation and not an order or mandate.” It goes on to say, “As with deciding whether students should return to in-person classes, remote learning or a blend of the two this fall, school administrators and locally elected school boards should make decisions on sports.”

As far as youth sports go, the recommendation applies to individual and team school and non-school recreational youth sports, competitions, intramural play and scrimmages. The recommendation does not apply to collegiate and professional sports. Gatherings are still limited to 25 people indoors and 250 outdoors.

The PIAA and District 10 voted recently to move ahead with fall sports on the high school level. Surrounding states have either gone to a delay in the start of the season or have moved contact sports to the spring.

The question about fans was posed after a large pushback from parents and fans over word that spectators would not be allowed at fall high school sporting events. On June 10, Wolf’s office put out guidance that read, “During the Yellow and Green phases of reopening, sports-related activities at the PK-12 level are limited to student athletes, coaches, officials, and staff only.”

The PIAA is set to meet again on Aug. 26 with the regular season for contact sports starting on Aug. 28 with football. Other contact sports begin Sept. 4. Heat acclimatization practices start Monday for football with all fall sports practices starting Aug. 17. Contact Tom Reisenweber at treisenweber@timesnews. com. Follow him on Twitter @ETNreisenweber.

At Biletnikoff Field in Erie on Aug. 12, 2019, Erie High School defensive lineman Dahan Lomax, 18, left, and Kendrick Person, 17, complete a blocking drill. On Thursday, Gov. Tom Wolf said high school sports across Pennsylvania should be put on hold.

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Erie Times E-Edition Article-Virus data in Pa. sows confusion

Posted by M. C. on June 22, 2020

WE HAVE BEEN HAD

Along the way, however, the state has repeatedly struggled to explain how data is being collected and used. Instead, officials have had to play defense to dispel confusion and baseless conspiracy theories after a number or metric has unexpectedly changed.

As early as March, county coroners raised concerns about the health department’s process, and the lack of a uniform death reporting system led to discrepancies between state and county counts.

At daily news conferences throughout much of April, Health Secretary Rachel Levine, M.D., discussed the department’s efforts to “reconcile” death data — to merge and vet numbers being collected from multiple systems. That effort is still ongoing, leading to delays between the date deaths occur and the date they are reported publicly.

Even the state’s process of defining COVID-19 deaths became a major point of confusion. – It shouldn’t be that difficult.

So where were you all this time Erie Times-News? Laying palm leaves wherever Wolf and Levine trod.

I had mentioned my own concerns along similar lines via letters to the editor and emails to “reporters”.

Nothing.

The state has turned this into a (worse) horrendous disaster. All the “data” that has put Erie county on unemployment, forced local businesses to close or spend thousands to remain partially open is a mess. This is just what is being admitted. Tip of the iceberg?

Whenever I hear “we go by the data” I think bad “data” is something to blame (besides people) when the “state” causes something to go belly up.

Of course fake data has it’s advantage$. Pains were taken to note “intentional manipulation” was not a factor. Does thee protesteth too much?

It is apparent from the article the state knew they fostered a disaster. Yet, threaten to act against their power grab and you are threatened with violence.

Expand this to a national and international level. Governments world wide almost certainly have bungled this and taken advantage.

Has COVID Cash has been a factor in jacking up the numbers? If not in Erie certainly in all the larger cities and internationally. The WHO is funded to a great extent by government and private institutions. Crying “the sky is falling” with the appropriate doom and gloom numbers is a sure way to keep the cash flowing. Same for cash strapped EU countries.

The good thing is the annual pandemic, that kills 20-60K in the US and hundreds of thousands world wide and that no one pays much attention to, influenza, has seemingly disappeared. I wonder where it went!

State government and its institutions need to be taken to court and to jail before they hurt more people.

https://erietimes-pa-app.newsmemory.com/?publink=00ed62901

Opaque, shifting policies, numbers undercut efforts, understanding

Spotlight PA is an independent, nonpartisan newsroom powered by The Philadelphia Inquirer in partnership with the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette and PennLive/Patriot-News. Sign up for our free weekly newsletter.

HARRISBURG — Data is difficult.

At its best, it’s a tool for sound policy. Data can cut through noise to help spot trends, like new clusters of the coronavirus. It can prove which communities face the most risk and where supplies are most needed.

At its worst, though, data brings trouble. Without context, it can seem to tell a story that might not be true. A county’s case count on its own is misleading without information about tests. A death toll might be declining, but it won’t account for reporting delays.

While there is no evidence of intentional manipulation, the state’s coronavirus data blunders have created openings for confusion and baseless conspiracy theories.

Since March, data about the coronavirus has played a profound role in Pennsylvania, underpinning sweeping decisions to close schools, restrict businesses and separate loved ones. Now, in the early days of the state’s reopening, accurate data is critical to detecting a resurgence.

But over the past three months, the state health department has repeatedly failed to safeguard the public’s trust in its data. While there is no evidence of intentional manipulation, the state’s blunders have created openings for confusion.

A Spotlight PA review of the state’s COVID-19 data practices found:

• From the start, Pennsylvania officials failed to acknowledge the full limitations of COVID-19 data. The state has not always clearly explained to the public what numbers mean, what they don’t and when and why they might change.

• On several occasions, the health department has published data without careful vetting. When mistakes have been made, the state has quietly edited information without clearly documenting and communicating the changes.

• The state has been opaque about its methods and sources used to compile the data, obscuring the public’s ability to scrutinize the numbers.

Taken together, these shortcomings make it difficult for researchers, policymakers, and the public to get an accurate sense of what’s happening.

“The whole picture isn’t being painted,” said Raeven Faye Chandler, director of the Pennsylvania Population Network, a research center housed at Penn State, “and it’s possible that we could derive results that are more optimistic than they actually are.”

In a statement, the state health department defended its handling of COVID-19 data, saying it has faced immense challenges and has tried to be transparent.

“Funding for public health in Pennsylvania is among the lowest in the country, and some of the work being done … is work that up until this response, had not been possible,” the department said. “We are providing data on a daily and weekly basis that previously took months and sometimes more than a year to compile.”

The statement added that “when there are items that may confuse the public, we are doing our best to explain what happened.”

Chandler, whose work focuses on social demographic and health research, uses the state’s numbers to build a data-driven analysis of COVID-19’s effect on high-risk populations. She said she understands the challenges the health department is up against, “given the unprecedented nature” of the pandemic.

But the problem, she said, is there has been “no discussion presented to provide clarity” when the state’s methods with data have changed.

“With the lack of information, it’s hard for researchers to understand what’s happening and what the risks are and how that may vary across populations,” Chandler said.

Be clear and transparent

Since the start of the pandemic, Pennsylvania officials have said decisions would be driven by data. They have asked the public to trust the process, saying policies would be fact-based and fair.

Along the way, however, the state has repeatedly struggled to explain how data is being collected and used. Instead, officials have had to play defense to dispel confusion and baseless conspiracy theories after a number or metric has unexpectedly changed.

In April, Gov. Tom Wolf announced a reopening benchmark with clear numbers, easy for the public to track. If a county had fewer than 50 new cases per 100,000 people over the past 14 days, Wolf said, it would be a sign that it’s safe to start reopening.

“We’re going to be applying the metrics that I mentioned — the number of cases per 100,000 people — to make sure that we’re doing this in a data-driven, evidence-based way,” Wolf said at the time.

Local officials and the public latched on to the metric, only to see the state reopen counties that failed to meet it. Wolf later explained the benchmark had always been one of many, and had shifted as the state’s understanding of COVID-19 evolved.

State officials have likewise struggled to explain how they are collecting death data.

As early as March, county coroners raised concerns about the health department’s process, and the lack of a uniform death reporting system led to discrepancies between state and county counts.

At daily news conferences throughout much of April, Health Secretary Rachel Levine, M.D., discussed the department’s efforts to “reconcile” death data — to merge and vet numbers being collected from multiple systems. That effort is still ongoing, leading to delays between the date deaths occur and the date they are reported publicly.

Even the state’s process of defining COVID-19 deaths became a major point of confusion.

Questions about whether the health department’s count included deaths probably caused by the coronavirus have circled for months. The peak of confusion was in April, when the department announced the addition of probable deaths to the count, then, two days later, said they removed more than 200 of them.

“There wasn’t any clarity, aside from minimal asterisks,” Chandler said.

Currently, the state’s death count does include some probable deaths, according to a department spokesperson. But a member of the public wouldn’t know that. The state releases a daily breakdown of confirmed and probable cases, but does not do the same for deaths.

The state has also faltered in the collection of data about race.

For much of the crisis, it has been mandatory for Pennsylvania health-care providers to report the race and ethnicity of people with COVID-19, but the state still lacks the data for more than half of its almost 80,000 cases.

“It’s a really big deal,” Chandler said. “We need this data to be able to understand how COVID-19 may be disproportionately impacting individuals, particularly those who may be more vulnerable.”

Even when data about race and ethnicity is included, the state doesn’t disclose how it was obtained.

That’s a crucial missing piece of the puzzle, said Bob Gradeck, manager of the Western Pennsylvania Regional Data Center at the University of Pittsburgh’s Center for Social and Urban Research.

As the state tries to understand issues with equity, Gradeck said, “it’s important to understand the context” — where numbers about race and ethnicity come from and whether the collection process has been consistent across the state.

Vet data before it goes public

On June 8, the health department debuted a new data dashboard. At its launch, the dashboard’s number of tests appeared impossibly high. The trendline showed a jump overnight from about 12,000 tests administered one day to 26,100 the next.

But the data was wrong.

After Spotlight PA inquired, Nate Wardle, a spokesperson for the department, acknowledged the error, saying the second day’s number should in fact be 9,410. Hours passed before it was corrected. The situation is just one of many.

In mid-May, when the health department published a long-awaited list of nursing homes with outbreaks of COVID-19, the numbers were immediately contested. Without disclosure or acknowledgement, the department began quietly correcting issues. Days later, they admitted to some problems.

Complexities and shifts “should be expected,” said Gradeck, of the Western Pennsylvania Regional Data Center. “It’s not surprising that the numbers change.”

But if you’re clear about the data’s limitations from the start, he said, you avoid “setting yourself up for a gotcha moment.”

And with data constantly revised, it’s important to provide historical numbers, said Coral Sheldon-Hess, a professor of computer information technology and data analytics at the Community College of Allegheny County.

People analyzing Pennsylvania’s COVID-19 data need to know when to “correct any past numbers, to help make predictions better going forward,” Sheldon-Hess said.

But that hasn’t happened in every case.

Since March, the health department has kept an archive page of coronavirus data, publishing daily tallies. But the archive doesn’t disclose when numbers were later corrected, nor does it explain why the department changed its methodology.

What’s more, the health department said June 8 that with the launch of the new data dashboard, it would no longer be posting updates to the archive page. That wouldn’t be necessary, Wardle said, given that the dashboard contained a “graphical depiction” of when COVID-19 cases and deaths occurred.

A day later, after hearing that the dashboard was difficult for some people to use, the department resumed posting to the archive page.

Make data easy to scrutinize

In 2016, the Wolf administration pledged to make government data available and usable to the public.

“One of our most valuable and underutilized resources in state government is data,” Wolf said at the time.

The initiative centered around OpenDataPA, an online portal for data that’s both free for anyone to use and structured in a way that’s easy for computers to process. Think: Excel spreadsheets or CSV files, not PDF files or tables posted on web pages.

The format of data is important, because it sets the stage for what the public can do with it.

“If I have three hours to work on a dataset and I spend two hours just getting that data, my time to explore and understand the data is limited,” said Jacob Kaplan, a postdoc fellow at the University of Pennsylvania, who’s been studying the spread of the coronavirus in prisons.

In the OpenDataPA portal, the catalog has a listing for data about the coronavirus. But the page doesn’t actually contain data.

Instead, it just links to the health department’s COVID19 website, where data is structured in a way that makes it cumbersome to work with and difficult to analyze.

If Pennsylvania made its source data easily accessible, it could have helped quash concerns in May, when the state said its total count of COVID-19 tests included negative antibody tests, then backtracked on the statement a day later.

The situation raised red flags among epidemiologists, as antibody tests show past infections, not current ones, and, if included, would distort the state’s capacity to detect infections in real time.

But as it stands, Pennsylvania is touting total testing numbers impossible for the public to vet. County-level data shows only the number of people receiving COVID19 tests, without disclosing how many times those people are tested.

Those numbers — exactly how many people are being tested more than once — are “reported internally,” Wardle, the spokesperson, said.

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PA Gov. Tom Wolf Signals He’s Open to Federal Investigation into Nursing Homes

Posted by M. C. on May 19, 2020

Governor Tommy must have received his medical training the same place as Cuomo.

Masks? Some are just more equal...

Levine admitted last week that he removed his mother from a nursing home during the pandemic.

“My mother requested, and my sister and I as her children complied to move her to another location during the Covid-19 outbreak,” Levine explained. “My mother is 95 years old. She is very intelligent and more than competent to make her own decisions.”

Wolf hired the wrong Levine.

https://www.breitbart.com/politics/2020/05/19/pa-gov-tom-wolf-signals-hes-open-to-federal-investigation-into-nursing-homes/

by Hannah Bleau

Gov. Tom Wolf speaks at a news conference in his Capitol offices as he unveils a $1.1 billion package intended to help eliminate lead and asbestos contamination in Pennsylvania's schools, homes, day care facilities and public water systems, Wednesday, Jan. 29, 2020 in Harrisburg, Pa. Looking on are Democratic state …

Pennsylvania Gov. Tom Wolf (D) on Monday signaled that he is open to a federal investigation into his administration’s handling of the coronavirus outbreak in nursing homes, as they comprise the majority of coronavirus deaths in the state…

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Government Licensing Is Just As Illegitimate – LewRockwell

Posted by M. C. on May 19, 2020

But the occupations necessitating a license and the requirements to obtain a license vary so widely from state to state that the whole process seems quite arbitrary and illogical. And besides, since when is it the proper role of government to forbid or permit people to exercise what should be their natural right to make a living? Since when is it the proper role of government to forbid or permit people to freely contract with other people to provide them services?

Although the states opening up and removing the ridiculous restrictions
they have imposed on businesses because of the coronavirus insanity is a
good and necessary thing, it does not mean that we will be returning to
a free society—not when Americans still need permission from the
government to work. Government licensing needs to be done away with
along with government lockdowns and restrictions.

https://www.lewrockwell.com/2020/05/laurence-m-vance/government-licensing-is-just-as-illegitimate/

By

Karl Manke, a barber in the fascist state of Michigan, recently opened his barbershop in downtown Owosso in violation of Governor Gretchen Whitmer’s executive order for non-essential businesses to remain closed. He has been following all of the ridiculous government safety guidelines: wearing masks, social distancing, and using an ultraviolet sanitizer on his tools.

Customers came from around Michigan and waited hours to get their hair cut. “I’m doing walk-ins, appointments, working people in between appointments,” Manke said. “It’s hard, but I love doing it. I’m so grateful I can make a living again.” The 77-year-old barber said that he was “not trying to prove some point,” but just “needed to get back to work.” Governor Whitmer “is not my mother,” he added. “We’re not children, we can manage our own lives.”

Manke received a citation for violating the executive order on the third day he was open. He also faces two misdemeanor charges for reopening his shop despite state shutdown orders: a health department violation and the governor’s executive order violation.

So, what else did the state of Michigan do? It revoked his barber’s license.

Elsewhere in the “land of the free,” restaurants that are reopening in violation of governors’ executive orders are being threatened with having their liquor licenses taken away.

In the fascist state of Pennsylvania, politicians in Beaver, Dauphin, and Lebanon counties declared that their counties would begin returning to business as usual on May 15. “It is time to reopen the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania and return our state to the people (as prescribed by our Constitution) and not run it as a dictatorship,” Dauphin County Board of Commissioners Chairman Jeff Haste wrote on May 8.

Pennsylvania’s Democratic fascist governor, Tom Wolf, responded with a threat “to withhold federal stimulus money from counties—and take away liquor licenses from restaurants—that open up in defiance of state law”; that is, his decree. Said the governor:

The enemy is a deadly virus set on destroying us. Yet, over this past weekend, some have decided to surrender to this enemy. These are politicians who were elected to serve their fellow citizens. Others are business owners who have chosen to serve their customers by putting them in harm’s way. These folks are choosing to desert in the face of the enemy.

There will be a price to pay for this “morally wrong” behavior.

To those politicians who decide to cave in to this coronavirus, they need to understand the consequences of their cowardly act.

A greater enemy than the virus is the Pennsylvania governor.

All of this state-level fascism brings up a point that most people are not thinking about: government licensing is just as illegitimate as government decrees ordering businesses to shut down.

Since, as the Michigan barber said, the governor is not our mother, and neither are government bureaucrats our fathers, babysitters, caretakers, or nannies, why is it that adults must get permission from the government to open a business, engage in commerce, work in certain occupations, have a particular vocation, or provide a service to willing customers? In other words, why do Americans need permission from the government to work?

An occupational license is simply a certificate of permission and approval from a government-sponsored board that a job-seeker is required to obtain before he can begin working in a certain occupation. These licenses are most commonly issued by state governments.

And it’s not just professionals like as doctors, lawyers, dentists, and accountants who must obtain a government license. Many other occupations are licensed as well: barbers, auctioneers, child-care workers, animal breeders, manicurists, interior designers, emergency medical technicians, skin-care specialists, upholsterers, hair shampooers, bill collectors, fire-alarm installers, midwives, make-up artists, crane operators, fishermen, security guards, security-alarm installers, coaches, taxidermists, sign-language interpreters, locksmiths, bartenders, taxi drivers, pest-control applicators, funeral attendants, and travel agents. It all depends on the state one lives in.

Proponents of occupational licensing would have us believe that without such government intervention in the economy, businesses would be full of untrained, incompetent, uneducated, unqualified, unscrupulous workers who would take advantage of consumers, rip them off, provide them with poor quality service, injure them, and possibly kill them.

But the occupations necessitating a license and the requirements to obtain a license vary so widely from state to state that the whole process seems quite arbitrary and illogical. And besides, since when is it the proper role of government to forbid or permit people to exercise what should be their natural right to make a living? Since when is it the proper role of government to forbid or permit people to freely contract with other people to provide them services?

Although the states opening up and removing the ridiculous restrictions they have imposed on businesses because of the coronavirus insanity is a good and necessary thing, it does not mean that we will be returning to a free society—not when Americans still need permission from the government to work. Government licensing needs to be done away with along with government lockdowns and restrictions.

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A Nation of Sheep – LewRockwell

Posted by M. C. on May 14, 2020

For a few weeks now, I thought the most extreme of these governors
has been Gov. Phil Murphy of New Jersey, who publicly admitted that he
didn’t think or care about the Bill of Rights, even though he took an
oath to uphold it. Yet, Gov. Tom Wolf of Pennsylvania has surpassed him.

When Wolf learned that some Pennsylvania county sheriffs would not
use force to enforce his non-law edicts, and some public accommodations
would open their doors — consistent with public safety but in defiance
of his non-law edicts — he threatened to withhold state aid from all who
live in those counties and to close the liquor stores that, by his
non-law edicts, remain open. This is straight out of 1930s Germany —
punish the community because of the resistance of a few. In Wolf’s
Pennsylvania, the people work for the government.

Does the government really work for us, or are we afraid of it?

https://www.lewrockwell.com/2020/05/andrew-p-napolitano/a-nation-of-sheep-2/

By

“When the people fear the government, there is tyranny. When the government fears the people, there is liberty.” — Thomas Jefferson (1743-1826)

To Thomas Jefferson, the fulcrum between the people and the government they have elected was fear. He argued succinctly that the government would only respect liberty if it feared losing power. Today, the relationship between people and government is power. Does the government have the power to tell us how to make personal choices, or do we have the power to tell the government to take a hike?

Stated differently, does the government work for us or do we work for the government?

Jefferson’s answer to that question in 1801, the year he became president, was that the government worked for us. Today, unfortunately, this same question has two answers — a functional one and a formal one. One would stumble answering this question if one looked only at how some state governors are treating the people for whom they claim to be working. One needs to look as well at the nature of government in a free society.

Six months ago, no one could have imagined where we are in America today. Then, if anyone had suggested that the governors of all 50 states, in varying degrees of severity, would be using police to interfere with personal choices — choices that we and our forbearers have all made without giving a second thought to the preferences of the government — no one would have believed it.

Think for a moment of how you would have reacted to any pre-COVID-19 idea that the police in America — using not the force of opinion but the force of arms — would prevent you from going out of your home, operating your business, jogging in a park, patronizing a restaurant or clothing store, buying a garden hose, going to Mass or church or temple or mosque or even joining a small public gathering of folks who want to protest these prohibitions.

Where did these prohibitions come from? They have come from the ever-changing edicts of governors and mayors, who rely on the ever-changing evaluations of medical data from an ever-changing cast of scientific experts. They are the pronouncements of politicians who have forgotten that they are elected to enforce laws, not to write them, and to be the servants of the people, not their masters.

Why do Americans accept this? We are a nation born in a bloody revolution against a king. The founders of America made the profound and indisputable choice of establishing a government dedicated to the cacophony of liberty over the illusion of safety.

They embedded that choice in the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution. The former states, unequivocally, that no government is legitimate without the consent of the governed and that government’s principal duty is to secure our rights. The latter — which expressly protects the right to make personal choices — is the supreme law of the land, and thus all governmental acts are subordinate to it.

We have fought wars against tyrants who wanted to tell us how to live. Today, we have elected our masters who are doing just that.

Americans seem to accept the restrictions on our rights to speech, religion, travel and commercial activities simply because the origin of those restrictions is a popularly elected person. But even an elected government can be tyrannical. Should you bow to these restrictions merely because their authors were elected and they have persuaded your neighbors that the prohibitions are for their own good — the Declaration and the Constitution be damned?

Stated differently, the governments that have interfered with our well-established rights to go about our daily lives as we see fit — taking chances whenever we cross the street, drink a glass of water, bite into food, sit next to a stranger on a train or at a baseball game, or go through a green light in our vehicles — have failed their first obligation, which is to safeguard our freedoms to take those chances.

Instead of safeguarding our freedoms — our natural rights to make personal choices — the governors and their police enforcers have treated us as if we work for them.

Does the government work for us or do we work for the government? Formally, it works for us. We elect officials because we trust their judgment. We authorize those officials to protect our rights, and we prohibit them from interfering with our personal choices.

For a few weeks now, I thought the most extreme of these governors has been Gov. Phil Murphy of New Jersey, who publicly admitted that he didn’t think or care about the Bill of Rights, even though he took an oath to uphold it. Yet, Gov. Tom Wolf of Pennsylvania has surpassed him.

When Wolf learned that some Pennsylvania county sheriffs would not use force to enforce his non-law edicts, and some public accommodations would open their doors — consistent with public safety but in defiance of his non-law edicts — he threatened to withhold state aid from all who live in those counties and to close the liquor stores that, by his non-law edicts, remain open. This is straight out of 1930s Germany — punish the community because of the resistance of a few. In Wolf’s Pennsylvania, the people work for the government.

My colleagues at The Wall Street Journal have unearthed the facts that more Americans die annually from heart disease, cancer, accidents and non-COVID-19 respiratory failure than die annually (annualized) from this coronavirus. Every death diminishes me. So does every suppression of liberty. So does every denial of the right to make choices and take risks.

Does the government really work for us, or are we afraid of it?

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Erie Times E-Edition Article-Officials: No timetable for county to enter green phase

Posted by M. C. on May 13, 2020

State and county leadership has not changed.

Erie County might not enter…

Dahlkemper said that she asked about a timetable to enter the green…

They didn’t say specifically…

Dahlkemper received no guidance from Wolf or Levine…

“The response we got was that they have not determined…

http://tinyurl.com/ycvtbghc

Erie County might not enter the green phase of Pennsylvania’s COVID-19 reopening plan until all of the other counties in the state have left the red, or most restrictive, phase.

Erie County Executive Kathy Dahlkemper said that she asked about a timetable to enter the green, or least restrictive, phase during a conference call Tuesday with Gov. Tom Wolf and Secretary of Health Rachel Levine, M.D.

“They didn’t say specifically, but I understood that they want everyone to get to yellow,” Dahlkemper said.

Twenty-four Pennsylvania counties, including Erie and Crawford counties, entered the yellow phase on Friday. Thirteen more counties will enter the yellow phase this Friday.

But all of the counties in the eastern part of the state remain in the red phase with no timetable to advance to yellow. In addition, Dahlkemper received no guidance from Wolf or Levine about the criteria needed to move from yellow to green.

“The response we got was that they have not determined what those data points would be, but they want to get us all transitioned to yellow,” Dahlkemper said.

Dahlkemper reported two new confirmed cases of COVID-19 in the county Tuesday. The county’s total has risen to 122 during the pandemic.

Ninety-seven of those people have recovered from the virus, Dahlkemper said. Two have died. That leaves just 23 active cases of COVID-19 in the county, even though 27 cases have been reported since Thursday.

“To be recovered, you need to be 72 hours past your last symptoms,” Dahlkemper said when asked about the recent cases.

“Some do recover quickly, and also when did some of these people get tested or get the results of their test,” Dahlkemper said.

The county has recorded 2,734 negative test results. Contact David Bruce at dbruce@timesnews. com. Follow him on Twitter @ETNBruce.

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Pressure Mounts on Pennsylvania Gov. Tom Wolf as Even Democrats Now Question Coronavirus Shutdown

Posted by M. C. on May 11, 2020

“There is no excuse for what is going on, okay?” Chester County State Sen. Andrew Dinniman, a Democrat, stated, contending that the Department of Health has failed the most vulnerable — those in nursing homes.

“A total of 3,416 coronavirus deaths has been reported statewide through Thursday. Of those, 2,355, or nearly 69 percent, were associated with nursing or personal care homes,” the outlet reported:

On Wednesday, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center’s (UPMC) chief medical officer, Dr. Steven Shapiro, also called for the state to reopen, noting that in Pennsylvania, the median age of death from the virus is 84.

The clueless comrade

Power and Control

https://www.breitbart.com/politics/2020/05/09/pressure-mounts-pa-gov-tom-wolf-democrats-question-coronavirus-shutdown/

by Hannah Bleau

Pennsylvania Democratic gubernatorial candidate Tom Wolf speaks with members of the media and after receiving the Service Employees International Union's endorsement Friday, June 6, 2014, in Philadelphia. Wolf is challenging Republican incumbent Gov. Tom Corbett in Nov. 4th general election. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)

Pressure is increasing on Gov. Tom Wolf (D) to reopen Pennsylvania, even among Democrats, as it is revealed that the vast majority of recent coronavirus deaths in the state occurred at nursing homes or personal care facilities, the Morning Call revealed this week.

Roughly 80 percent of the recently reported deaths in the state of Pennsylvania, 247 out of the 310 reported on Thursday, occurred at either a nursing home or personal care facility.

“There is no excuse for what is going on, okay?” Chester County State Sen. Andrew Dinniman, a Democrat, stated, contending that the Department of Health has failed the most vulnerable — those in nursing homes.

“A total of 3,416 coronavirus deaths has been reported statewide through Thursday. Of those, 2,355, or nearly 69 percent, were associated with nursing or personal care homes,” the outlet reported:

In the Lehigh Valley, the state reported 177 deaths in such facilities, with 77 in Lehigh County and 100 in Northampton County.

This week, the nursing homes operated by Lehigh and Northampton counties, Cedarbrook and Gracedale, both reported sharp increases in deaths.

Over the past seven days, about 76% of deaths added to the state’s total — 850 of the 1,124 newly reported deaths — were at personal care homes or nursing homes.

The statewide death toll has risen to 3,616 as of Saturday morning as the majority of healthy, low-risk individuals remain under stringent lockdown orders.

On Friday, Gov. Tom Wolf (D) announced 13 counties that will be allowed to move into the “yellow” phase of reopening next week — a phase that continues to come with a host of restrictions. Twenty-four Pennsylvania counties moved into that phase on Friday. However, some local leaders of counties in “red” phase states are outraged over the governor’s decision.

Dan Camp, commissioner chairman of Pennsylvania’s Beaver County, said on Friday that the governor’s decision to keep the county in the “red” phase is  “unwarranted and irrational,” noting that the vast majority of the county’s coronavirus-related deaths stemmed from nursing homes.

“It’s no secret that nearly 70 percent of our COVID-19 cases and more than 90 percent of Beaver County’s COVID-19 related deaths are attributed to one nursing home within the county,” he said, essentially corroborating the greater findings.

On Wednesday, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center’s (UPMC) chief medical officer, Dr. Steven Shapiro, also called for the state to reopen, noting that in Pennsylvania, the median age of death from the virus is 84.

“The few younger patients who died all had significant preexisting conditions. Very few children were infected and none died. Minorities in our communities fared equally as well as others, but we know that this is not the case nationally,” Shapiro said during a roundtable discussion with Sen. Pat Toomey (R-PA).

“In sum, this is a disease of the elderly, sick and poor,” he added.

The news coincides with a recent analysis of a provisional data set published by the Centers for Disease Control’s National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS), which found that the average age of Americans who have died as a result of the coronavirus between February 1 and May 2 is 75.

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Erie Times E-Edition Article – Spike in COVID-19 cases expected in yellow phase

Posted by M. C. on May 3, 2020

On unemployment, will you still have a job, will there be a job, will there be anything left of your business?

Don’t worry, the almighty (the one in Harrisburg) will tell us…sometime. Meanwhile in Erie County…

Dahlkemper said there is no timeline as to when Erie could move to the “green’’ phase.

Dahlkemper said she is awaiting further state directives

It’s a decision that will be made by the state.

As the county prepares to enter the yellow phase, Dahlkemper said she will seek additional guidance from Wolf’s office on COVID-19 testing.

She said Erie County also needs to build on its contact tracing efforts, and will require additional state guidance for its enforcement and compliance division.

This is the politicians way of saying “no clue, no plan”.

That is how Erie County takes the reins to look out for you.

Don’t feel alone, that is the way it is all over.

A medical crisis that has been brewing in China for years. The CDC, NIH, WHO, CIA, FIB all did NOTHING to prepare and missed an epidemic sweeping China it until it was too late.

THE MASTER PLAN

So the solution chosen by the best medical minds money can buy is lockdown everyone and everything and pray to God (the one NOT in Harrisburg) that some one, some where, some how, some way comes up with a solution.

It was Patton that said If everyone is thinking alike, then somebody isn’t thinking.

I’ll bet Governor Wolf’s plan will be great once it is figured out.

Erie County needs its own plan. Now

http://tinyurl.com/y6veqmk9,

Spike in COVID-19 cases expected in yellow phase

Erie County Executive Kathy Dahlkemper believes it’s inevitable Erie County will see a spike in COVID-19 cases after it transitions starting Friday to the “yellow” phase of Gov. Tom Wolf’s state coronavirus reopening plan.

Dahlkemper reported two new confirmed COVID-19 cases Saturday, pushing the county’s total number of positive cases to 90. There have been 2,034 negative tests, and 66 people have recovered from the virus. One of the new cases is a person in their 40s and the other a person in their 50s, Dahlkemper said. Both people reside in Erie.

The “yellow” phase to which Erie County and 23 other northwestern and northcentral Pennsylvania counties were elevated to on Friday brings a loosening of restrictions aimed at slowing the spread of the new coronavirus.

“We certainly believe there will be a percentage of people who will relax their efforts with social distancing and wearing masks, and that does concern us,” Dahlkemper said. “We certainly feel people will be out more and around other people more, and when they do go out, they need to maintain that 6-foot distance. It will be up to each one of us. People

Dahlkemper

will probably get more relaxed, and that’s where the concern will be” Friday marked a resumption of the construction industry, and the opening of marinas, golf courses and campgrounds In Erie County.

Dahlkemper said county health department enforcement surveillance teams will monitor campgrounds, marinas and golf courses to observe and ensure residents and businesses are complying with guidelines.

“If they see anything egregious, they will call the business and ask them to correct it immediately,” Dahlkemper said.

Erie County is the most populated of the 24 counties granted “yellow” phase status, Dahlkemper said.

When Erie County partially reopens on Friday under the yellow phase, the county’s stay-at-home order will be lifted in favor of aggressive mitigation measures.

Under the yellow phase, large gatherings of more than 25 are prohibited; in-person retail will be permitted, though curbside pickup and delivery is preferable; restaurants and bars remain limited to carry-out and delivery service; telework will continue where feasible; and businesses with in-person operations must follow business and building safety orders.

Dahlkemper reiterated that businesses such as gyms, spas, hair and nail salons, casinos and theaters likely will not reopen until Erie County moves to the “green” phase of Gov. Wolf’s state reopening guidelines.

Dahlkemper said there is no timeline as to when Erie could move to the “green’’ phase.

Dahlkemper said the Millcreek Mall would likely remain closed under yellow phase restrictions.

“There is no way to control the number of people there,” Dahlkemper said. “How do you control crowds and make sure people are wearing masks? Will there be disinfectant stations available? It’s a decision that will be made by the state.”

Dahlkemper said she is awaiting further state directives on some businesses that fall under a gray area in the yellow phase, such as libraries, dog-grooming facilities and churchrelated activities.

Garden Centers will likely be able to reopen on May 8, she said.

Wolf’s office on Monday is expected to provide additional information on categories of businesses whose operational status is uncertain under the upgraded yellow phase.

As the county prepares to enter the yellow phase, Dahlkemper said she will seek additional guidance from Wolf’s office on COVID-19 testing.

She said Erie County also needs to build on its contact tracing efforts, and will require additional state guidance for its enforcement and compliance division.

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Under order, face masks mandatory for workers in PA

Posted by M. C. on April 16, 2020

Why wait until we are at/past the peak?

Why do I see no masks?

Why do all three of these people need to be there in a group? Aren’t they special!

I guess the point is to make the unwashed masses think you know what you are doing.

https://www.wkbn.com/news/coronavirus/under-order-face-masks-mandatory-for-workers-in-pa/

by:

Pennsylvania Secretary of Health Dr. Rachel Levine, flanked by Gov. Tom Wolf and Department of Education Secretary Pedro Rivera, provides an update on the coronavirus known as COVID-19 on Thursday, March 12, 2020.

Pennsylvania Secretary of Health Dr. Rachel Levine, flanked by Gov. Tom Wolf and Department of Education Secretary Pedro Rivera, provides an update on the coronavirus known as COVID-19 on Thursday, March 12, 2020. (Joe Hermitt/The Patriot-News via AP)

HARRISBURG (WKBN) – Pennsylvania Gov. Tom Wolf announced an order Wednesday, requiring those who work in the state to wear masks and take other social distancing actions in order to prevent the spread of COVID-19.

Pennsylvania Department of Health Secretary Dr. Rachel Levine signed an order that directs businesses that have maintained in-person operations to protect their workers by providing face masks and making it a mandatory requirement at the worksite. Businesses also must stagger stop and start times for employees, when able to, to prevent gatherings of groups…

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